All posts by Seth Resler

How Radio Stations Can Use Gary Vaynerchuck’s $1.80 Instagram Strategy

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

Gary Vaynerchuck (a.k.a. “Gary Vee”), the CEO of digital media agency VaynerMedia, is a popular speaker, author, and podcaster in the digital marketing space. He’s also an Instagram evangelist.

Gary Vaynerchuk

Personally, I am bearish on Instagram’s value as a marketing tool for radio stations. First, because radio is not an inherently visual medium. Second, because Instagram — unlike, for example, Pinterest — does not allow users to include clickable links inside individual posts. You can only include a clickable link in the account profile. This makes it very difficult to use Instagram to drive traffic back to your radio station’s website, where you can steer visitors towards actions that contribute to your station’s bottom line.

Nonetheless, as Facebook tweaks its algorithm to show users less content from businesses and media outlets, many radio stations are expressing a desire to invest more time and energy into other social networks, including Instagram. (Note: Facebook owns Instagram.) If your radio station is looking for some practical advice for approaching Instagram, you may want to adopt Vaynerchuck’s $1.80 Instagram strategy.

1. Identify Popular Hashtags in Your Market
Last year, Instagram enabled people to search posts by hashtag. To do this, open Instagram on your phone and click the magnifying glass icon at the bottom of the screen. When the search bar appears at the top of your screen, click in it. Four tabs will appear: Top, People, Tags, and Places. Click on “Tags” and type in the tag that you want to search for.

One way to find popular hashtags in your market is to choose a big venue, such as a convention center, university, or park. Go to the calendar on the venue’s website. Browse the upcoming events, find the websites for the most popular events, and scan their social media feeds for hashtags. Using this technique, you may discover local hashtags like #ComicConSLC or #DenverBeerFest.

You can also find hashtags with a site like TrendsMap.com. Although Trends Map tracks Twitter hashtags, not Instagram hashtags, the two social networks are likely to have overlapping hashtags.

Vaynerchuck recommends identifying the ten hashtags that are most relevant to your audience. Some of those hashtags, such as #Orlando, may stay the same over time. Others, such as #FinalFour, may come and go.

2. Leave Thoughtful Comments
For each of these ten hashtags, you’ll want to identify the top nine posts. When considering posts, look at a number of factors — the number of followers the posting account has, the number of likes, the number of comments, the relevance to your audience, etc. This is not an exact science; you’re eyeballing the post and making an educated guess. On each of these top posts, leave a thoughtful comment. Gary refers to this as “adding your 2 cents,” which is where the $1.80 strategy comes from: 10 hashtags * 9 posts * $.02 = $1.80.

It’s important to make sure the comments you leave are relevant and engaging to the publisher of the original post. A good example: Reply to a local comedy club who posts about an upcoming show with Kathleen Madigan by saying “She’s hilarious! Can’t wait for the show!” A bad example: Replying with a generic “That’s awesome!” on multiple posts.

3. Browse Local Posts and Comment
Because radio stations have geographic boundaries that many other companies don’t, you can also identify top relevant posts by conducting a search for local images. To do this, when you search Instagram, simply click on the “Places” tab instead of the “Tags” tab.


4. Repeat Daily
Gary claims that if you do this every day for a month, you will see substantial growth in your Instagram following. It’s worth noting that he’s measuring success in terms of the number of Instagram followers you have. I think it’s far more important to keep an eye on your Google Analytics to see if the amount of incoming website visitors from Instagram increases. Also, watch to see how many of these visitors produce goal conversions.

The $1.80 strategy is time-consuming. Vaynerchuck suggests spending about three hours per day finding and responding to posts. At this point, I can’t endorse it as a tried-and-true method for stations with limited resources. However, for radio brands/personalities looking for a practical way to experiment with Instagram strategies, this is a good place to start. You can then refine your strategy based on the results.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

The WordPress Plugin That Will Help Your Radio Station’s Website Get Into Google Search Results

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

“Search Engine Optimization,” which is the art of getting your website content to show up in the results of search engines like Google when people search for specific terms, is often overlooked by radio stations. SEO is a critical component of any digital strategy. I would argue that it is as important to pay attention to your radio station’s SEO strategy as it is to pay attention to your radio station’s Facebook strategy.

Why do you invest time and energy into making sure that your website content can be found on Facebook? Because lots of your listeners use it.

Why should you invest time and energy into making sure that your website content can be found on Google? Because lots of your listeners use it.

Yet SEO can be intimidating. An entire cottage industry has popped up around search engine optimization. You can hire a company to go through all of your website content and optimize it for you. But if you can’t convince your GM to make this expenditure — or if your station is not producing enough website content yet to justify the cost — there is a WordPress plugin that can help you with the basics.

The Yoast SEO Plugin
Yoast SEO is a popular WordPress plugin, which means that your station’s website will need to be built on the WordPress platform to take advantage of it. Yoast actually offers a handful of plugins, including ones to optimize videos, commerce websites, and local businesses. They also offer a premium version of their plugin. I recommend that you start with the free version of the regular plugin and, once you get the hang of it, decide if you want to upgrade.

What exactly does the Yoast plugin do? It does a lot — it’s quite powerful! — but in this column, I am going to focus on its ability to control what people see when your content is shared on social media or found in search engine results. Here are the basic steps:

1. Install the Yoast Plugin and Configure the Sitewide Settings
Your web developer can quickly install the Yoast plugin just like they would install any other website plugin. Once they do, they can navigate to the plugin’s settings page by clicking on ‘SEO’ in the dark left-hand column in the WordPress backend. Your webmaster can go through each tab one at a time. Most of these settings are intuitive, but there is a Configuration Wizard and plenty of support documentation if you need it.

2. On Individual Pages and Posts, Get in the Habit of Configuring Your SEO Settings
Now that the plugin has been installed, you will see a new box in the WordPress backend of your posts labeled “Yoast SEO”:

Here, you can control what shows up in Google, Facebook, and Twitter when this particular webpage is found there. Note the three icons to the left: Three vertical dots, the ‘Share’ symbol (three dots connects by lines), and a gear.

Google Settings
When you click on the three vertical dots, you can control how your page will appear in Google search results. The ‘Snippet Preview’ shows you how your page will appear in Google. By default, the plugin will pull the first several words from your post. However, you’ll want to write a concise summary of the post to be used instead. Click the ‘Edit Snippet’ button, and you can type in the summary you want Google to use. A colored bar will turn red to show you if your summary is too long.

You can also control the headline that Google uses here. By default, the plugin uses the title of the blogpost. However, there are circumstances in which you may want to use a different headline. For example, you want “keywords” — the words people are likely to type into Google when looking for content like yours — to appear in the headline. This increases the chances that your content will show up in Google’s search results. If they are not already in the post or page’s title, you’ll want to include them here.

In fact, if you enter “Focus Keywords” in the ‘Analysis’ section below, the plugin will tell you how you can improve the likelihood that your content will appear in Google’s search results. It will identify ‘Problems,’ suggest ‘Improvements,’ and tell you what’s ‘Good’ about the post.

On our blog, Fred often uses artistic titles. For example, he might write a blogpost about The Beatles called “Remembering the Fab Four.” This title makes sense when you see it within the context of our website, but it is unlikely to show up in Google’s search results because most people will search for “Beatles,” not “Fab Four.” So we want to use the Yoast plugin to change the headline that appears in Google to “Remembering The Beatles” without changing the headline that appears at the top of our webpage. We can do that here.

Social Media Settings
When you click on the ‘Share’ icon, you get to the social media settings for your post or page. Here, you can control what appears when this webpage is shared to Facebook or Twitter. In addition to the headline and the excerpt, you can also control the image that is used. By default, the Featured Image is used for social media. However, for really important pages — such as a page about your radio station’s big annual concert — you may want to use images that are the ideal sizes for each social network (1200 by 630 pixels for Facebook and 1024 by 512 pixels for Twitter).

Advanced Settings
Finally, if you click on the gear icon, you’ll find the ‘Advanced Settings.’ The ‘Meta Robots Index’ allows you to decide if this particular page should be indexed by Google. I often set pages that I don’t want to be seen by the general public to “No Index.” For example, you may want to do this with any pages that are only meant to be seen by clients.

There’s a lot more that the Yoast SEO plugin can do, but by taking an extra minute to configure these settings every time you publish new content on your website, you increase the likelihood that your content will appear in search engines, and the likelihood that people will click through to your content when they see it on social media.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

7 Ways to Strengthen the Calls to Action Your Radio Station’s Website

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

When listeners come to your radio station’s website, what do you want them to do? Do you want them to stream the station? Sign up for the email newsletter? Enter a contest? Purchase tickets to a station event? It’s important to know the goals of your website.

Once you’ve determined these goals, you’ll want to create clear “calls to action” on the site to encourage people to do these things. A call to action is usually a link that takes people where you want them to go, such as a button that says “Listen Now” that allows people to stream the station. Here are some ways to improve the calls to action on your radio station’s website:

1. Know Which Calls to Action Are Important
Too often, radio station websites homepages are overloaded with stuff. What’s worse, all of this stuff is given equal weight. The truth is, some actions that listeners can take on your website are far more valuable than others. If they stream the station, that could increase ratings and impact the station’s bottom line. If they peruse the station’s photo gallery, that’s not nearly as valuable. The website  layout ought to prioritize the calls to action that are most valuable, and de-emphasize or remove links to less valuable actions.

2. Give Them Prime Real Estate
Your most important calls to action should be given the best spots on your website. Studies shows that people’s eyes move across websites in an “F” pattern. First, they scan the top of the site from left to right. Then, they scan from left to right again below the first pass. Finally, they scan down the left side of the page.

This means the most important spot on your website is the top left corner. This is where you want to put the station logo so people know what the website is all about. The second most important spot on your radio station’s website is the top right corner. Don’t waste this space on something trivial like a weather report. Put your most important call to action — such as a “Listen Now” button — here.

The sidebar is also valuable real estate. Put other calls to action here in order of importance. Remove anything that isn’t an important call to action from the sidebar. Less is more.

Keep in mind, the layout of the mobile version of your website is different — people simply scroll from top to bottom. This may change the value of the real estate. For example, if your mobile website moves the sidebar to the bottom of the page, this location may not be as effective for calls to action as it is on the desktop version of the site.

3. Give Them Some Space
Instead of cramming calls to action up against other elements of your website, set them apart with some whitespace. A buffer indicates that an action is important and draws attention to it.

4. Make Buttons Look Like Buttons
From time to time, I’ll come across a call to action that looks more like an ad than a button. It’s often an image with some overlaid text. In some cases, it’s not immediately obvious that this is a clickable link. Make sure that your most important calls to action look like buttons so that it’s clear to listeners that can click on them.

5. Set Them Off with Color
To attract attention to a call to action, use button colors that contrast with the rest of your radio station’s site. For example, the dominant colors on our website are blue and grey. When a call to action is really important — in our case, usually when it leads to a page where we ask people for their email address — we create an orange button. For links that are less important, we’ll use a blue button or just linked text.

Can you spot the call to action on the Jacobs Media homepage?

6. Use a Strong Verb
Use a short phrase that starts with a strong verb as the text for your button. For example:

  • “Listen Now”
  • “Enter to Win”
  • “Sign Up”
  • “Get Details”

7. Set Clear Expectations
Make sure that people know exactly what is going to happen when they click on a link. In some cases, the text on the button will be enough to convey this information (ex: “Listen Now). In other cases, you will want to include supporting text above the call to action. For example, if you are asking people to sign up for an email list, tell them exactly what you will send them and how often they can expect to receive emails. (Ex: “Get our concert listing in your email inbox every week.”)

Taking a few moments to strengthen your website’s calls to action can dramatically improve its performance and can have a noticeable effect on your radio station’s overall digital strategy.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

Your Radio Station Staff Should Have These Images on Hand

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

With the rise of the worldwide web, even audio mediums like ours have an increasing need for a strong visual presence. Chances are, multiple staff members at your radio station, from your Promotions Director to your Web Designer to your Salespeople, will need station images from time to time. It’s a good idea to set up a shared folder where the appropriate people can easily access these images:

  • The station logo (color)
  • The station logo (black and white)
  • A collection of logos from stations in the cluster
  • The company logo
  • The morning show logo
  • Logos for key station events, such as annual concerts
  • Headshots of each on-air personality
  • A publicity photo of the morning show
  • Various “action” publicity photos, such as the street team at an on-site promotion or a DJ introducing a band onstage at a concert

By collecting pre-approved images into one place, you’ll make everybody’s job easier. Now they don’t have to waste time hunting them down.

Web vs. Print Images
It’s important for your staff to know the difference between image files that are suitable to be used on the web, and files that are appropriate for use in printed materials. For the web, you want image files to be small, so they load quickly. The resolution of an image is measured in “dots per inch,” or “DPI.” (Technically, web images are measured in “pixels per inch,” but “PPI” and “DPI” are often used interchangeably.) On computer screens, images only need to be 72 dots per inch to look crisp to the human eye.

On the other hand, printed images need a higher resolution to look crisp. Print houses usually require that artwork be at least 300 dots per inch. If you try to use a 72-dpi image for printed materials, it will look “pixelated.” One of the easiest ways to slow a project down is to send a designer or print house a 72-dpi image when they need a 300-dpi image. In your shared images folder, it’s a good idea to have one subfolder labeled “Web Images” filled with 72-dpi versions of the images and another subfolder labeled “Print Images” containing 300-dpi versions of the same images.

Image Formats
Images can come in a number of different file formats. Each format has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. You can read this deep-dive into the formats, but here are the key points to remember:

  • .JPG or .JPEG: Compresses the file to make it smaller, making it quick to load on websites, but there is a slight loss in image quality; you cannot save transparency (such as a transparent background) with this file format.
  • .PNG: Compresses the file without any loss in quality and it can save transparency.
  • .TIF or .TIFF: Good for print, but often produces files that are larger than you want for the web.
  • .GIF: Compresses the file to make it smaller; it can be animated and it can save transparency, however it is limited to only 256 colors.

These file formats are used with specific image editing programs; you probably won’t use them unless a graphic designer requests them:

.PSD (Photoshop)
.AI (Adobe Illustrator)
.XCF (GIMP)
.CDR (CorelDRAW)

A small way to make everybody’s job easier at your radio station is to make sure that staff members can quickly and easily get the images they need in multiple file formats. It helps to include a “cheat sheet” in your shared image folder to help people understand which images to use under different circumstances. By doing this, you can save your staff some time.

 

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

How to Repurpose Audio as Video to Promote Your Radio Station on Social Media

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

As radio broadcasters, we create audio content day in and day out. Unfortunately, audio doesn’t go viral on social media. If we want our audio content to spread, it’s best to turn it into video before posting it to social networks. Fortunately, there are a host of tools to help us do that.

Audiograms
Radio morning shows routinely take an excerpt from their latest show and repurpose as a recorded promo. That same recorded promo can also be repurposed as an audiogram.

An audiogram is a video that combines a static image with a waveform to match overlayed audio. For example, here is an audiogram that I recently created for my podcast, The D Brief:

There are a number of tools available to help you quickly and easily convert your audio into an audiogram. The audiogram above was made with Wavve.co. You may also want to look into Audiogram, Repurpose or SpareMin. Many podcasters use Auphonic to polish up the sound quality of their episodes, and it is also capable of creating audiograms.

Here is an audiogram made with Audiogram:

Ripl and Sweepers
Another tool that I like to use is Ripl. Ripl is a smartphone app that allows you to take a produced sweeper and turn it into a short video promo, like this:

Ripl is designed to be a full-blown social media marketing solution, allowing you to easily share videos to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. It also provides analytics so you can measure the engagement your videos produce.

Sometimes I use Ripl for generic promos like the one above. Other times, I’ll use it to promote a specific podcast episode:

Your radio station can use Ripl to promote upcoming interviews, contest or station events.

Note that these tools produce square videos. That’s because Instagram uses square videos, and because square videos take up more of the screen when viewed in Facebook on a smartphone.

Experiment with these tools and see if you can find one that fits best into your workflow. By taking a few extra minutes each day, you can repurpose your radio station’s on-air content as videos that are more likely to be shared on social media.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

Here’s Why Most Podcast Listening Happens on Apple Devices

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

The overwhelming majority of podcast listening happens on Apple devices. While it can fluctuate, podcast hosting companies will tell you that roughly two-thirds of all podcast consumption takes place on iOS devices. Android comes in a distant second place.

So, why does Apple dominate the podcast medium?

To understand that, we need to take a closer look at the process involved in listening to a podcast. This process is slightly different on the two operating systems.

Apple used to include podcasts in a dedicated section of iTunes, its music management app. When it introduced iOS6 in 2012, it separated podcasts out into their own app, called Podcasts. When Apple introduced iOS8 in 2014, it made Podcasts a native app. That is, the Podcasts app came pre-installed on every iOS device; people no longer needed to download it from the App Store themselves.

So the steps required to listen to a podcast became:

  1. Open the Podcasts app.
  2. Find the podcast you want.
  3. Subscribe to the podcast.
  4. Download the latest episode.
  5. Play the episode.

Android phones, on the other hand, do not come with a dedicated podcast app already installed. As a result, listening to a podcast on an Android phone requires a few more hoops:

  1. Open the app store.
  2. Find and download a “podcatcher” (an app for listening to podcasts).
  3. Open the podcatcher.
  4. Find the podcast you want.
  5. Subscribe to the podcast.
  6. Download the latest episode.
  7. Play the episode.

It’s just a couple of extra steps, but those steps have a huge impact on podcast listening. That’s why many people in the podcasting space, myself included, believe the top factor that would increase the number of people who listen to podcasts globally is not just the release of compelling content (like Serial), but rather a technological development; if Google embraced podcasts by including a native podcatcher on every phone, listenership would increase dramatically.

Google took a step in the right direction in 2015, when it started including podcasts in its Google Play Music app; but this really just brings Google up to where Apple was in 2013, when it still included podcasts in a section of iTunes.

Of course, there are other technological developments that could drive more podcast listening. Spotify has embraced podcasts recently, and its app is installed on thousands of Android phones. Smart speakers, like the Amazon Echo and Google Home, could also contribute to an increase in podcast listening. So could dashboard operating systems like Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Still, the development that most of us are waiting for is the native Android podcatcher. It may come any day now, or it may never arrive. We’ll just have to wait and see.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

Write Digital Instructions to Help With Radio Station Staff Turnover

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

I tell people that you’re not really in the radio industry until you’ve been fired at least once. We work in an industry with a lot of turnover, and that means we can lose a lot of time to learning curves as new people step in to take over the duties of previous employees.

It’s not just staffing changes that can cause disruptions. If a member of your team gets sick or injured, you may need somebody to step in and fill their role for a bit. To minimize the digital disruption in these situations, it’s helpful to write instructions and save them in a place where multiple people have access to them.

I am a big proponent of writing out clear step-by-step instructions, complete with annotated screenshots, for every digital task you can’t live without. Here are some of the things you will want to have instructions for:

  • How to send an email blast
  • How to send a text message blast
  • How to publish a blogpost
  • How to update the website’s concert calendar
  • How to set up a contest on the website
  • How to publish a podcast episode
  • How to back up the website
  • How to restore a backup of the website
  • How to publish a video to the station’s YouTube channel
  • How to set up online ticket sales for a station event
  • How to post an advertisement on the website

These instructions are useful not only to people who have to take over a role, but also to the same person who may have performed the task in the past. Because I do it so infrequently, I often have to go back and figure out what I did the previous year. If you’re responsible for an infrequent task, such as setting up ticket sales for an annual station concert, it can be incredibly valuable to go back and read instructions — even if you’re the one who wrote them!

If you don’t already have instructions for your most important digital tasks, start writing them today. The next time you have a staff position turnover, you’ll be glad that you did.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

How a Content Calendar Can Improve Your Radio Station’s Blog

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

When I was the Music Director at 107.7 The End in Seattle, I spent every minute of my workday trying to achieve the right mix of on-air content. Like most radio stations, we had expensive software that enabled me to a balance of new and old, hard and soft, fast and slow. The goal was to create an on-air product that appealed to a wide swath of listeners.

The goal of your radio station’s website is the same. But do you invest as much energy into getting the mix of content right?

Just like the music scheduling software you use for your on-air content, it’s helpful to have a tool to get the right mix of online content. Fortunately, it’s not going to cost you anything.

The Weekly Web Meeting and the Content Calendar

Radio stations should carve out time with the appropriate staff members for a weekly meeting to plan out the upcoming week’s blogposts. Spend the first half of the meeting on old business: review your website, social media, and email analytics, much like you would review callout research in a music meeting.

Next, turn to new business: The analytics you just reviewed can help you decide what new blogposts to write. In place of music scheduling software, use a spreadsheet to schedule the week’s blogposts. I recommend posting this spreadsheet as a shareable document in the cloud — as a Google Spreadsheet, for example — so everybody can log in at any time and see the latest version. This way, you don’t have to email back and forth about every blogpost.

Download a Content Calendar Template

In your weekly web meeting, decide what topics you want to cover in the blog during the upcoming week. For example:

  • What events are happening in town?
  • What concerts are coming up?
  • What new albums will be released?
  • What holidays are around the corner?

More Blogpost Ideas

Once you’ve decided what blogposts to write, assign the posts to your staff members with the appropriate due dates.

Encourage your staff to check the Content Calendar regularly throughout the week. This way, not only will your blog writers will know what’s due when, but your on-air staff will know when there’s new blogposts that they can talk about on the air.

In short, it’s time that your radio station put the same amount of careful planning into your online content as you do your on-air content. A Content Calendar can help you do that.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

5 Browser Extensions to Boost Your Productivity

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

I spend hours on my web browser each day. In fact, without a browser, I would be unable to do my job. Over the years, I’ve incorporated a number of browser extensions (Mozilla calls them “Add-Ons”) into my daily routine. Extensions are third party plugins that add extra functionality to a web browser. When you install a browser extension, they usually add an extra button to the toolbar.

Here are some of my favorites that you may want to use:

1. Hootsuite’s Hootlet
I work with a ton of social media accounts. In addition to running my personal Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram accounts, I handle accounts for Jacobs Media, my podcast The D Brief, and various other side projects. I find that the easiest way to manage all of these accounts is to use a social media management tool. While I know a lot of people who are fans of TweetDeck, I have always been partial to Hootsuite. Hootsuite allows you to manage all of your social media accounts from a single place.

One of my favorite features of Hootsuite is a browser extension called the Hootlet. The Hootlet allows you to quickly and easily share the webpage you are on to your social media accounts. Whenever I come across an article that I think will interest Jacobs Media followers, I press the Hootlet button and a pop-up window appears. I write a quick post and share the webpage on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn in one fell swoop.

Get the Hootsuite Hootlet for Chrome or Firefox. TweetDeck has a similar browser extension called Tweetdeck Launcher for Chrome.

2. Pushbullet
I use many different devices, and they don’t always use the same operating system. For example, I have an Android phone, but an iPad and an iMac. Sometimes I want to share something between these different devices. For example, I often begin writing my blogposts in an app called Drafts on my iPad before moving it to my desktop so I can import the text into WordPress and format it. Other times, I’ll take photos on my phone at an event like CES and then want to share them with my iMac to use them in a blogpost.

I have found the Pushbullet app to be incredibly useful for pushing content from one device to another. It’s often faster and easier than using a thumb drive or even a filesharing service like Dropbox. And, of course, Pushbullet offers a browser extension. This allows me to push content to or from a browser to one of my other devices. You can get it for Chrome or Firefox.

3. Priceblink
Priceblink is one of several browser extensions that comes in handy when looking to buy something online. When you go to a product page on a website like Amazon, Priceblink will check other sites to see if any of them are selling the same product for less. It will also let you know if there are any coupon codes for that product floating around the web. I frequently find myself saving money with the Proceblink extension, which you can get for Chrome or Firefox.

4. Bulk URL Opener
I am known for having an absurd number of browser tabs open at all times. For example, I will open dozens of URLs at once when doing show prep for my weekly podcast, The D Brief. To do this, I use an extension called the Bulk URL Opener. It allows me to paste a list of URLs into a pop-up window and open them all at once. If you have a list of websites that you want to check quickly, such as a list of concert venues in your market, this extension comes in quite handy. You can get it for Chrome, or a similar extension for Firefox.

5. MightyText
Like many people, I find text messaging to be an incredibly convenient form of communication. But when I’m working on the computer, I find it annoying to constantly have to pick up my phone to respond to people. That’s why I use MightyText, an app that allows me to send and receive text messages on my computer. Like these other apps, MightyText has a browser extension that allows you to easily correspond with people from within Chrome.

Do you have a web browser extension that you recommend? Tell us about it in the comments.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

20 Digital New Year’s Resolutions for Your Radio Station

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

It’s that time of year when we set goals for ourselves and our radio stations. What will your 2018 digital strategy resolutions be? If you need some inspiration, here are some ideas:

Website

Blog

Email Marketing

Podcasts

Other Departments

Interfaces

This is the year to take your radio station’s digital strategy to the next level. Let me know if I can help.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.