Category Archives: Engineering

SBE Releases New Engineering Handbook

SBEhandbookThe Society of Broadcast Engineers and McGraw-Hill Education have released the SBE Broadcast Engineering Handbook: Hands-on Guide to Station Design and Maintenance. This new book offers detailed practical information on video, audio, and broadcast transmission systems from dozens of the field’s foremost experts. Featuring everything from basic principles and formulae to the latest technologies and engineering trends, this hands-on resource offers practical and up-to-date coverage of all major broadcast technologies for radio, TV, and related fields.

The handbook features in-depth tutorials that stress key topics throughout, complete coverage of radio and television technologies, and is written from the perspective of the broadcast engineer. More than 50 authors have contributed their expertise to the ten sections of the book. The handbook has been deftly assembled by Jerry Whitaker, editor-in-chief. He is vice president of standards development for the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) in Washington, DC, and also the author or editor of more than 40 technical books.

The book covers every aspect of broadcast engineering in seven sections: Regulatory Issues, RF Transmission, DTV Transport, Information Technology Systems, Production Systems, Facility Issues, Broadcast Management, plus three reference annexes.

The book is available from the SBE Bookstore. SBE members can purchase the book at the member discount price of $159 through the SBE Bookstore. The book is also available through www.mhprofessional.com and online retailers for $199.

Engineering Spotlight: Dave Grant, Cumulus Media (Grand Rapids)

We’re pleased to begin a new spotlight series featuring the hardworking engineers at our stations.  To nominate an engineer for a spotlight, please email Alisha Clack at clack@michmab.com.

Dave GrantDave Grant
CPBE, Chief Engineer, Cumulus Media, Grand Rapids.  Approaching 4 years, but this is his second time working for WLAV; was the CE for WLAV-AM/FN from 1986 to 1993.

Brief Engineering Resume:
Dave: My first radio job was screening calls for a sports talk show on WKBZ-AM (Muskegon). From there I started running Tiger games and eventually got a job as an on-air announcer at WLRQ-AM in Whitehall. (side note, WLRQ, currently WKLQ, is now owned by the Cumulus Muskegon cluster!) From there, I went next door to the FM station owned by Regional Broadcasting at the time. It was automated, so that left time to tinker with equipment. I became more interested in engineering, and started helping the regional engineer whenever anything needed repair.

I have been really fortunate to have had a couple of great engineering mentors over the years, and opportunities to work with them on a contract basis for a lot of different stations early in my career. This gave me a very broad education on repairing and troubleshooting a myriad of different types and brands of equipment. After that, I went to my first real full-time engineering job in Florida, and spent two years at two different stations before returning to be the Chief Engineer for Liggett Broadcasting. After that, I went to WLAV and spent seven years before the station was sold. I then decided a change would do me good and went into telecom working for a small local competitive telephone company. They were bought and sold many times before eventually becoming part of Verizon. All the while I kept a couple contract stations, I just couldn’t get radio out of my system.

I spent fifteen years in telecom, with the last two years working in Baghdad under contract with the U.S. government. After that ended, I began looking for full-time work again and eventually landed at Cumulus.

Q: How did you get started in broadcast engineering?
Dave:  I love music and grew up listening to the Big 89, WLS. Around age 13, my family moved to Muskegon and we lived near the WTRU-AM studios and transmitter site. I rarely could tune in WLS at home, so WTRU became my station. I listened to that station a lot, and originally was more interested in being an announcer. Eventually I would be an announcer for WTRU, but as it turns out, I didn’t much care for it. Engineering had already taken hold.

Tell us something about yourself that very few people know…
Dave:  My on-air moniker was Dave Lee.

What is the best advice you’ve ever received?
Dave:  Always treat people well, you never know when you might end up working for them. Karma is everywhere.

Engineering Spotlight: Keith Bosworth, Cumulus Media (Detroit)

We continue our spotlight series featuring the hardworking engineers at our stations.
To nominate an engineer for a spotlight, please email Alisha Clack at clack@michmab.com.

Keith-Bosworth_800

Keith Bosworth
Chief Engineer for Cumulus Media (WJR-AM, WDRQ-FM, WDVD-FM) in Detroit.

Brief Engineering Resume:

2003 Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts
2004-2013 Cumulus Media, Toledo
2013-Present Cumulus Media, Detroit

Keith shares his broadcast history:

“I started working as a Board op for Cumulus Media Toledo at WTWR (Monroe, MI) in 2004. Every time the Engineer (Kevin Hawley) would come in, I would watch him and I was a little savvy.  A few months later I was asked by Kevin if I would like to lend a hand installing new transmitters that were coming in for Cumulus Toledo. Halfway through the installs, he asked if I would like to be an assistant engineer, because as he put it, I was a good learner. Although to this day I tell him he was a good teacher.

After being at the Job for a few years and soaking up all the knowledge I could Kevin left to go to WJR. At that point, I was on my own and became Chief Engineer and IT of the eight station cluster in Toledo, which I did for 7-8 years on my own. When the position at Cumulus Detroit opened up, I applied for it and got it, but not until they found a replacement for me in Toledo.

In my career, I have also rebuilt four of the studios in Toledo and had the pleasure of helping build some state of the art facilities like the new Westwood One TOC in NY, the Nash Nights Live Studio in Nashville, TN, and 16 new studios in San Francisco, CA.

Before I got into broadcasting, I was a Chef and still love to cook.

The best advice I was ever given: to be a good engineer, you don’t have to have all the answers, you just need to know where to find them.”

SBE Certification at GLBC ‘16


View More: http://benjamindavidphotography.pass.us/mab--glbc-2014By: Geary S. Morrill, CPBE-CBNT

SBE Chapter 91 Certification Chairman

As you may have heard, we have a unique opportunity presented at the upcoming GLBC.

Wayne Pecena, CPBE-CBNE, is the Assistant Director of Educational Broadcast Services in the Office of Information Technology at Texas A&M University. He will be presenting an in-depth Advanced IP Networking & CBNE Study Topics tutorial on Monday, May 2nd, and will proctor the CBNE exam at GLBC the following morning.

Because the Certified Broadcast Network Engineer (CBNE) exam has a five-year service requirement, it is important that all applications to take the exam be sent to the National SBE office by Friday, April 1.

The candidate for Certified Broadcast Networking Engineer (CBNE) must have five (5) years of suitable experience in broadcast engineering or related technology and must achieve a passing grade on the proficiency examination.

Some of the general areas of emphasis on the CBNE will be:

  • Audio/Video over IP for Broadcast
  • Digital Content Management
  • Video Systems in an IT World
  • Data Transmission Systems and Practices
  • General PC Hardware, interconnection, and backup

Final GLBC LogoThere is also the opportunity to write the Certified Broadcast Newtork Technologist (CBNT) exam for those not having that certification.

This certification is designed for persons who wish to demonstrate a basic familiarity with networking hardware as utilized in business and audio/video applications in broadcast facilities. People who have passed the CBNT® exam were tested on subjects related to:

  • Network topologies and layouts
  • Common network protocols
  • Wiring standards and practices
  • Maintenance, troubleshooting and connectivity issues
  • Challenges unique to broadcast-based networks

Both exams are of the “open book” variety, with the exception of one essay question on the CBNE exam. There is a discounted price for the exams for current SBE members, and Certification is good for 5 years. Non-members can also take the exam, and their fee includes a one year membership in the SBE.

Applications for the exam are here:

Certified Broadcast Networking Technologist® (CBNT®)
Certified Broadcast Networking Engineer™ (CBNE™ )

Additionally, there is more information on the exam process here:

FAQ Certification page

Find out about the Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference at bit.ly/GLBConference.

Regards,

Geary-signature2

Engineering Spotlight: Tom Bosscher, WCSG-FM Grand Rapids

We’re pleased to begin a new spotlight series featuring the hardworking engineers at our stations.
To nominate an engineer for a spotlight, please email Alisha Clack at clack@michmab.com.

Tom BosscherMy name is Tom Bosscher. I am the chief engineer for WCSG-FM, Grand Rapids, and I have been employed here for 20 years. They haven’t caught on yet.

My cousin Rick Bosscher and I taught each other electronics when we were ten years old. We received our amateur radio licenses when we were 13. In high school, Rick challenged me to go for the FCC 1st class Radio Telephone License, just for the fun of it. So we both did. The summer out of high school, WION in Ionia was looking for a licensed person to take meter readings for their directional AM. So, you could say I started my career at a 5,000 watt daytimer! A few months later, I was working full time at WOOD-AM-FM. I also was employed at WLAV and spent 13 great years working for Dave Gale at WCUZ. Dave and I started to work at WCSG as contract engineers in 1985, and ten years later it became a full time situation. Oh, my cousin Rick has been the RF supervisor for KFMB, San Diego for some 35 years.

Something most people don’t know? I have six sisters, three older, three younger. As a child, I was not allowed to talk. I’m still working on that social skill. On the bright side, at the age of 63, I have nine of the best grandchildren a guy could have. I also teach amateur radio courses for all three levels of licensing.

Best advice? Ask. Always ask. Ask those who use the equipment. And second? Inform. Always inform. Inform those who own the station. And third best? Learn how to fake sincerity.

Engineering Spotlight: Eric Send, Midwestern Broadcasting Company

We’re pleased to begin a new spotlight series featuring the hardworking engineers at our stations.
To nominate an engineer for a spotlight, please email Alisha Clack at clack@michmab.com.

Eric SendEric Send
Engineering & IT for Midwestern Broadcasting Company for the past sixteen years.

Brief Engineering Resume:
Intern Interlochen Public Radio 1992

WLDR Radio, Traverse City, MI 1996-2000 / Part-time on-air talent

WLJN Radio Good News Media 1999-present / Volunteer engineering & weekend on-air talent 2005-2010

Northwestern Michigan College AAS, Electronics Technology 2002

Q: How did you get started in broadcast engineering?
Eric: My grandfather got me interested in HAM radio. I got my HAM license (N8STO) when I was 12. A good friend and Chief Engineer for Good News Media, Don Parker, mentored me into the profession.

Tell us something about yourself that very few people know…
Eric: I enjoy watching British and Canadian TV. Doc Martin and Murdoch Mysteries are personal favorites.

What is the best advice you’ve ever gotten?
Eric: Make sure to point out your accomplishments to management and station ownership. Broadcast engineers often work odd hours and away from the studio. They fail to communicate what they are doing and can be perceived as slacking off, when in fact, they are contributing to the success of the station.

Engineering Spotlight: Geary S. Morrill, Digity Great Lakes Region

We’re pleased to begin a new spotlight series featuring the hardworking engineers at our stations.
To nominate an engineer for a spotlight, please email Alisha Clack at clack@michmab.com.

Geary MorrillGeary S. Morrill, CPBE-CBNT
Technical Manager at Digity Great Lakes Region for the past three years.

Brief Engineering Resume:
WLCC (Closed Circuit) Station Manager – LCC ’72-73 / Communication Electronics R.E.T.S. Flint, MI ‘77

Broadcast Engineering at local and or corporate level since ’77 / Pres & GM WIXC-FM Essexville, MI 92-98

Charter member – former Chair/Vice Chair SBE Chapter 91 / MAB and IBA Engineering Committee member

Q: How did you get started in broadcast engineering?

Geary: Since my days at LCC, when we were making technical upgrades, I would be involved. I was mentored by Steve Church while at WHNN-FM AM Drive. Bob Liggett picked up tuition for my R.E.T.S. schooling, which was at night some 50 miles from Bay City. Upon graduation, I took over as Chief Engineer and, shortly after, built the 3 tower DA and power upgrade for co-owned WBCM-AM.

Tell us something about yourself that very few people know…

Geary: I’m one of few broadcast engineers who is a Certified Radio Marketing Consultant (CRMC), and has experience in station ownership, sales, programming, and engineering, which allows me to evaluate situations from multiple perspectives.

What is the best advice you’ve ever gotten?

Geary: “The man who thinks he can and the man who thinks he can’t are both right.” – Henry Ford

MAB Teams Up With SBE at Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference & Expo

The Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference and Expo on May 2-3 will feature a training session and test for broadcasting engineers.  The session is being presented by Wayne Pecena on Monday, May 2. On Tuesday, May 3 broadcast engineers may sit for the SBE certification exam.

Important:  if you are sitting for this exam on Tuesday, you MUST fill out this form and submit it to SBE with payment prior to April 1, 2016.

The workshop will focus on understanding and applying IP based networking technology in an Ethernet environment. Tutorial topics will include an understanding of the OSI Model, Ethernet physical standards, Ethernet switching, IP routing, TCP & UDP use, and best practice security implementation techniques. A practical network design will be utilized to illustrate theoretical concepts by developing a best practice segmented network reference design suitable for the broadcast IP network. Considerations in the development will include physical architecture considerations, network infrastructure equipment selection, Ethernet switching & VLAN implementation, IP addressing approaches, IP routing choices, and security feature implementation. Practical design solutions will utilize popular industry networking devices. Bonus topics (based upon time) will include an introduction to IPv6 and steps to structured IP network troubleshooting.

At the conclusion of this workshop, attendees will have:

• An awareness of IP networking technology topics (broadcast focused)

• An understanding of applying fundamentals and principles in real-world practice

• An extensive IP networking reference document (pdf)

• Resources for further study & knowledge

If you have any questions regarding this session or SBE certification exam, please contact Jennifer Preslar at preslar@michmab.com or 517-484-7444.  Find out more about GLBC by clicking here.

Unique Benefits of Your ABIP Inspection

Gehman doing an ABIP inspectionThe Michigan Association of Broadcasters maintains a formal agreement with the Federal Communications Commission to operate the ‘Alternate Broadcast Inspection Program’ (ABIP).

MAB’s ABIP grants unique benefits to radio and television stations that elect to participate and resolve their deficiencies. These stations earn a three-year MAB ABIP Certificate of Compliance.

Not only does the MAB ABIP provide an independent, confidential written review of compliance with applicable FCC rules at your main studio and at each transmitter site, the program also provides expert recommendations and access to the MAB’s ABIP inspector, thereby enabling you to maintain the highest degree of operational compliance.

What if a violation inadvertently occurs and an FCC field agent appears at your studio location? Point out your MAB ABIP Certificate of Compliance, follow the agent’s instructions to resolve the issue of note, and contact the MAB office to facilitate mitigation of the occurrence with the applicable FCC field office.

Now is the time for your station to join the 2016 MAB ABIP and earn the inherit benefits – and enjoy compliance peace of mind! Contact Ann Walters today at walters@michmab.com, or call (800) 968-7622 to request your ABIP contract.