Category Archives: Management

Make it Memorable

dicktaylor
Dick Taylor

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Dick Taylor,  CRMC/CDMC
Dick Taylor Blog

https://dicktaylorblog.com/

I recently just returned from my first real vacation in many years. I joined some of the members of my high school class for an 8-day Caribbean Cruise.

We sailed aboard Carnival’s Splendor and it was wonderful.

Behind The Fun

Carnival offers a special behind the scenes tour of the ship on the last sea day of a cruise. It’s a very extensive tour that starts on the bridge and time with the captain, Splendor’s Roberto Tine.

Next, we travel to the ship’s engine room and visit with Splendor’s Chief Engineer Mario Testa.

What we basically learn is that everything on today’s cruise ship can be fully automated, but a full staff of people man the controls and make the decisions.

The Carnival Splendor can carry 3,012 guests along with a crew of 1,150.

The Key People

One of the light boards on the ship had pictures of the key personnel on the Splendor and showed four people, the captain, the chief engineer, the head of hotel operations and the cruise director.

MarQ

MarQ Anthony

The person just about everyone on the Splendor came in contact with was cruise director MarQ Anthony.

His Facebook page really tells the story of this dynamic personality. People write on his page things like: We will definitely be returning just for MarQ and his funny, crazy self. He blew it away. Truly an epic vacation. The most memorable moments of the cruise included the very talented, energetic and hilarious MarQ, our cruise director. I won’t forget this cruise anytime soon! Carnival has a jewel with MarQ and some other staff members on that ship. MarQ was fantastic, phenomenal, amazing and overall the most energetic and fun person I’ve ever met. He made every single event my mom and I attended on the ship memorable and we had a great time. The best part was seeing how much he enjoyed everything he did and his effort to connect and build relationships with people throughout the cruise. We looked forward to hearing his wake-up calls and getting into any event he was involved in on the ship. We loved you MarQ and we look forward to (hopefully) seeing you again!!!

I have to say, I concur with everyone’s comments and MarQ IS Carnival in my mind.

People Attract People

I wrote a couple of weeks ago about how it’s people that attract people. I wrote that article to emphasize how it was the radio personalities that put a fire in my belly to be a part of the radio business. I worked in radio for over four decades and then seven years ago I transitioned into teaching when I became a broadcast professor at a university. I wanted to light fires in the bellies of my students for the radio industry.

First Impressions

We never get a second chance to make a first impression. For my fiancé this was her first cruise. For me it was my second one but my first was about three decades ago, so it was like the first time for me too.

Good first impressions come from projecting a positive image and doing that comes from your attitude. MarQ led a team of people on the Carnival Splendor that had a positive attitude. Anna is the head of training and staff development on the Splendor and was the person who led our group of 16 people on our tour. (Note: the Behind The Fun tour of the ship is limited to a maximum of 16 people.)

The crew’s section of the ship is like a city within a city. It’s not as flashy as the guest accommodations but it is clean, comfortable and Carnival makes every effort to ensure that their team members are happy and well cared for. The hiring business model appears to put hiring people with the right attitude first. Everyone on the Carnival Team was upbeat, positive and fun to be around. They don’t just make a great first impression but reinforce that impression with every encounter.

8-Days, 4-Islands

The cruise was a wonderful vacation. We visited four islands over our eight-day cruise, we saw many wonderful and amazing things, we even rode a Segway, but what we will remember forever were the people of the Splendor and how they made us feel.

In the end, it’s not about stuff or things, but people-to-people encounters.

Automation

So much of the cruise experience could be fully automated, but it would pale with the experience we enjoyed because of the wonderful people on the Carnival Team.

Almost every radio station impacts more people with their broadcast signal than the 3,012 guests aboard the Splendor, but they lose their advantage when they automate and voice track their product. Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.

Clayton Christensen wrote in the “The Innovator’s Dilemma” that businesses are disrupted not because they ignored threats to their business but because they didn’t recognize the threats to their business.

Radio can’t dilute its core business while in pursuit of possible ancillary activities.

Radio’s core business is talented people totally engaged and focused on their service area, 24/7.

Reprinted by permission.

Dick Taylor has been “Radio Guy” all his life and is currently a professor of broadcasting at the School of Journalism & Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Dick shares his thoughts on radio and media frequenty at https://dicktaylorblog.com.  

How to Cure Millennials of Career Impatience

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

Ryan Jenkins

By: Ryan Jenkins
Next Generation Speaker / Inc.com Columnist

Millennials expect promotions and pay raises to come early and often. Here’s how leaders can channel this desire to their benefit.

A consistent complaint about Millennials is their unrealistic timeline for being promoted. They want a pay bump in a few months, a promotion a few months later and the title of CEO by end of their first year. Growing up in fast times and coming of age in an on-demand culture, Millennials have little patience for stagnation, especially when it comes to their careers.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of April 2016 Millennials held an average of 7.2 jobs from age 18 through age 28. A 2016 Gallup report revealed that 21 percent of Millennials say they’ve changed jobs within the past year — more than three times the number of non-Millennials. What’s more, this Millennial turnover is costing the U.S. economy $30.5 billion annually.

As work cycles continue to spin faster and project timelines become shorter, Millennial employees will move up or move on with greater frequency than previous generations.

Leaders need to get more comfortable with the accelerated career advancement expectations of Millennials and arm themselves with a few strategies to satisfy their desire for career progression and stop job-hopping.

To fully satisfy the diverse needs and desires of your Millennial team, consider using a combination of these approaches.

1. Mine the Motivation

Millennials are accustomed to external motivators. Perks, trophies and praise were used to motivate Millennials as they grew up. Because of this, many Millennials lack the internal motivation to overcome career impatience. If you want to deepen the determination and motivation of your Millennial employees, it’s up to the leaders to cultivate it.

The responsibility rests on leaders to cast a compelling vision and help Millennials discover their personal (intrinsic) motivation in achieving the vision and progressing within the organization. Help them to identify the necessary grit that won’t let them quit.

Millennials who gain early clarity on their internal motivations and career progression goals will be able to adjust their expectations and will be better equipped to explore cross-collaboration opportunities to gain more experience and to put their anxious ambition to good use.

2. Commit to Coaching

Coaching is the leadership style that resonates most with Millennials. Millennials were raised in organized activities where they were consistently surrounded by coaches. They view coaching as their path to greatness. The best coaches train, guide and advance while taking deep interest in those they coach.

Effective coaching builds trust, instills loyalty and helps Millennials become valuable faster. Coaching allows a leader to reflect on the progress and impact a millennial is having at the organization and recommend the right opportunities where they could continue their growth and development.

Coaching allows leaders to anticipate when a Millennial is struggling, frustrated, bored or underemployed before they decide to leave the company. Leaders should reemphasize there is no quick remedy for job satisfaction. It’s a slow, uncomfortable and complicated process.

3. Connect With Contribution

Parents encouraged Millennials to have a say at an early age. Access to the Internet also gave Millennials a platform to contribute and have a voice. They now carry this desire to contribute into the workplace. Leaders that create opportunities for Millennials to contribute and cocreate will be rewarded with Millennial loyalty and longevity.

Too often organizations underestimate the ability and desire Millennials have to contribute. Underestimating leads to resentment and underemployment leads to impatience. Create environments that encourage and channels that enable contribution.

4. Motivate With Movement

To satisfy Millennials’ desire to gain transferable skills, get them moving throughout the organization. Millennials don’t view career paths as linear like a ladder but rather multidimensional like a military cargo climbing net. They might be interested in moving left and then back down before moving up.

Be transparent and proactive in your communications about the available opportunities throughout the organization. Networking or social events, job shadows and online job directories are good examples of ways to help Millennials explore movement throughout the organization.

At Taco Bell’s corporate office, the company has a strategy where they loan their employees to other companies. If an employee notices another company is working on a project they are interested in, they can request to be loaned out on a temporary basis to work on that project — a nontraditional approach for a generation that approaches career and learning nontraditionally.

5. Develop for Departure

Offer the training, coaching and mentoring necessary for Millennials to develop themselves out of their current role or the organization. Why develop someone out of the organization? Because the alternative of not developing someone and having them stay and underperform is much worse.

Liz Wiseman, author of “Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work,” writes that a rookie mentality — approaching work or a job/task for the first time or from a new perspective — is the key to faster learning, better performance and persisting through failure. Departing Millennials can make room for new “rookies” ready to perform better and can bring a rookie mentality to their new role or company further advancing themselves or the organization.

If Millennials depart your company, they might not know how good they had it because they have nothing to compare it to this early in their career. When they experience the lack of development at another organization, they will boomerang back to your company. These will become your best company ambassadors. Leverage them wisely.

(This is 1 of the 47 strategies Ryan shares in his new book, The Millennial Manual: The Complete How-To Guide to Manage, Develop, and Engage Millennials at Work.)

This article was originally posted on Ryan’s Inc.com column, Next Generation Insights.

Reprinted with permission.

How to Help Millennials Overcome Failure

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

Ryan Jenkins

By: Ryan Jenkins
Next Generation Speaker / Inc.com Columnist

Millennials’ altitude in their career and your organization is determined by their attitude towards failure.

According to a Babson College survey, 41 percent of 25-34-year-old Millennials cited “fear of failure” as their biggest roadblock to starting a business, up from 24 percent in 2001. It would seem that Millennials are searching for safer paths towards success.

Millennials are interested in anticipating obstacles rather than stumbling through them. They will leverage today’s abundant information, tools, and resources to minimize risk.

Although Millennials have a complicated relationship with risk. They’ve grown up in a connected world where failure is more public and permanent. One wrong move and the Internet can immortalize one’s failure. In addition, success is prioritized over failure on social media. Millennials don’t see the missteps of their friends on social media, which gives the false illusion that they are the only one experiencing failure.

Millennials also perceive risk differently from previous generations. Some would claim that climbing the corporate ladder is safe, Millennials would call that risky. Some would claim quitting a six-figure job to start a green smoothie business is risky, Millennials would call that safe because they are taking control.

Many Millennials grew up over-protected by their hovering helicopter parents who would deflect anything that appeared to be a failure. Now Millennials are entering the workplace where some are experiencing failure for the very first time, and it’s up to managers to help them thrive through it.

Millennials’ altitude in their career and your organization is determined by their attitude towards failure.

Ultimately people have two choices when it to comes to reacting to failure: fail backward or fail forward. It’s a choice. Leaders are in a unique position to help Millennials choose to fail forward and begin to view failure as deferred success.

  • Display Empathy
    Authority is given but influence is earned. The quickest way to earn influence with Millennials is to listen. Listen and display empathy by stating “I see you’re really disappointed, I know you really wanted to do better on this project.” Or share your own struggles and stories of failure.
  • Instill Belief
    An authentic belief in the Millennial employee’s abilities will prompt them to take more risks and be bolder in their actions. Highlight the strengths, skills, and attributes that made you hire them. Cultivate the belief that self-image is not dictated by external events. Millennials must understand that their self-worth is not based on their performance.
  • Encourage Ownership
    People are tempted to blame others for their failure. Don’t tolerate Millennials pointing fingers and taking a victim mentality. Help them understand that they rob themselves of the learning and growth that’s inside failure when they don’t own their failure.
  • Emphasize the Journey
    Help them to view failure as a toll booth instead of a roadblock. With a tollbooth, a price must be paid to move forward. Prepare the Millennial for the journey, don’t prepare the journey for the Millennial.
  • Facilitate Failure
    Create environments where failing is easy and encouraged. Remove any fear or consequences of failure and communicate that failure isn’t fatal or final.
  • Contextualize Failure
    Offer context around the failure. Help Millennials to see the failure as temporary. Putting the failure into perspective will help them see failure as a momentary event, not a symptom of a lifelong epidemic.
  • Challenge Them
    Challenging Millennials with tough assignments provides opportunities for failure and communicates that you believe in their ability to rise to the challenge. Resilience is a muscle that must be intentionally developed and practiced.
  • Stress Strengths
    Failure can be minimized when people are operating in areas of their strengths. Help Millennials to be wary of laboring too long in areas of their weakness. Spending too much time overcompensating for weaknesses will increase the likelihood of continued failure.
  • Coach vs Intervene
    Resist the urge to intervene to assist a struggling Millennial. Allow the Millennial to marinate in the failure but coach them to come up with a creative solution. Intervening only robs the Millennial of the opportunities to learn problem-solving, develop resilience, and cultivate confidence to take on new challenges.
  • Affirm Effort
    Affirm the variables that the Millennial can control such as effort, empathy, or strategy. Good effort, whether or not they failed, should be rewarded or recognized (Read this for more on recognition best practices for Millennials.) Failing to try or put forth effort is unacceptable failure.
  • Move On
    Have Millennials pause to unpack the failure but help them to understand that the past cannot be altered. Spending too long thinking about missteps can lessen self-confidence, stall progress, and divert focus. Coach Millennials to quickly forget the negative emotions of the setback and encourage them to press forward resiliently.

Benjamin Franklin said it best, “The things that hurt, instruct.” Failure is a teacher. Trial and error (emphasis on the error) is what forges stronger character. Failure-free individuals grow into emotionally fragile professionals who are susceptible to anxiety and lack the grit to succeed.

(This is 1 of the 47 strategies Ryan shares in his new book, The Millennial Manual: The Complete How-To Guide to Manage, Develop, and Engage Millennials at Work.)

This article was originally posted on Ryan’s Inc.com column, Next Generation Insights.

Reprinted with permission.

How to Have Millennials Show Up to Work on Time

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

Ryan Jenkins

By: Ryan Jenkins
Next Generation Speaker / Inc.com Columnist

How often are workers late to work? Is the 9-to-5 schedule obsolete? Are employers becoming more lenient with worker tardiness?

CareerBuilder recently explored this topic with a Jan 2017 nationwide survey of more than 2,600 hiring and human resource managers and more than 3,400 workers across industries. Here are the findings…

  • Twenty-nine percent of workers admitted they were late to work at least once a month. (Up from 25 percent last year.)
  • Sixty-four percent of employers and employees believe the concept of “working 9 to 5” is an antiquated practice, but 53 percent of employers expect employees to be on time every day.
  • Forty-one percent of employers have fired someone for being late.
  • Twenty-nine percent say they have no problem with the occasional late arrival, as long as it doesn’t become a pattern. (Down from 33 percent last year.)
  • Sixty-nine percent of workers who arrive late will stay later to make up for it. (Up from 62 percent last year.)
  • Top reasons for being late to work: Traffic (49 percent), oversleeping (32 percent), bad weather (26 percent), too tired to get out of bed (25 percent), and procrastination (17 percent).

Even though these trends point to a greater employer lenience for tardiness, arriving at work or meetings on time remains a pertinent challenge that I hear frequently from my audiences of folks who manage Millennials.

Millennials have a 24/7 always-on approach to work so coming in late at 9:45am isn’t a big deal since they were sending emails since they woke up at 7:00am and plan to work until 11:00pm. And other times, Millennials are simply unaware that their tardiness is having an effect on those around them.

Whatever the case may be, these six steps should help managers:

1. Believe the Best

Leadership expert, Andy Stanley, says, “Occasionally, there are gaps between what we expect people to do and what they actually do. As leaders, we choose what to put in this gap. And what you as a leader choose to put in that gap will shape your culture. And what you put into that gap, will also be what your staff puts in that gap. You will either assume the worst or believe the best.”

“Developing a culture of trust is critical to the health of your organization. Trust fuels productivity. The message of trust is this…I think you are smart enough to know what to do, and you make a mistake, you will tell me then fix it,” says Stanley.

Stanley makes a compelling case to insert trust into the gap when you see your Millennial employee show up late. Choosing to insert your own assumption (for example: all Millennials are lazy) could cause you to overreact or lash-out and ultimately erode trust.

If the tardiness becomes a chronic issue, continue with the below steps.

2. Address Quickly

“If you want to build a culture of trust, you must confront fairly and quickly and refuse to sit on it. Before I assume the worst, I should at least ask for the facts. The consequences of concealment are far greater than the consequences of confrontation,” says Stanley.

Waiting so long that you react in anger towards the tardy employee is unacceptable and unprofessional. Or waiting too long and beginning to document their every move, you run the risk of making the employee feel like they are “being watched.”

After a few offenses, approach the employee directly. Schedule a one on one, coffee run, or lunch where there is ample time for both the employee and the leader to discuss the issue. They might not have a valid excuse or reason for their behavior, but they will appreciate you believing the best.

Don’t let your fear of being the “micro-manager” or “bad manager” get in the way of being the manager they need.

3. Diagnose the Cause

While in conversation with the late-arriver, take the posture of a coach trying to help the Millennial employee (like a doctor trying to diagnose the problem) and ask probing questions like…

  • Are you late for some things or everything?
  • Is there a certain day or time when you’re late?
  • How do you feel when you are late?
  • Does the amount of time you are late vary? (It’s likely there is a psychological hurdle if the amount of time is always the same and a mechanical problem if the amount of time varies day to day.)
  • What causes you to be late? According to Diana DeLonzor, author of Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, there are seven categories for late people:
    • The Evader: Struggle leaving the existing task until it’s perfect or 100 percent completed.
    • The Indulger: Lacking in self-control.
    • The Rationalizer: Won’t admit the problem and blame external factors.
    • The Rebel: Actually enjoy the idea of knowing that other people are waiting for them.
    • The Absent Minded Professor: Prone to innocent flakiness or the condition of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and get easily distracted on their way. They often lose track of time, misplace car keys, and forget appointments.
    • The Producers: Over-achievers who simply over-schedule their days and underestimate the amount of time their tasks will take.
    • The Deadliner: Subconsciously enjoy the thrill of the last minute rush. Rushing relieves boredom.

These are not excuses. Knowing the tardiness tendencies is the first step in getting lateness under control.

Both parties have responsibilities: Managers should take an active role in helping Millennials diagnose the cause and Millennials must be open and willing to discover the causes or tendencies that cause them to be late.

Alternate Step: Offer a Flexible Schedule

Why fight biology, hardened habits, or extenuating circumstances (family obligations, medical issues, etc.) when a re-engineered or custom schedule would allow the employee to be more productive and relieve you of some heartburn. Steps 1-3 may reveal that a flexible schedule would work best for the individual and team.

If you go this route, be prepared to explore other options for other employees, but you might be due for a 9-to-5 shake-up anyways. (Read this for how to manage a Millennial remote team.)

4. Communicate the Consequences

Don’t assume Millennials realize how their tardiness impacts others. Help them to see it clearly.

Quantify it. When you’re 10 minutes late to a meeting with 10 of your teammates, that is 10 minutes times 10, which is 100 minutes of unproductive time.

Help the Millennial to see the ramifications/consequences their tardiness has on other people. For example, because you were 15 minutes late, James had to fill in for you and the client ended up having to wait. Or not having you available online at 8:00am results in customer requests that sit for more than one hour.

Or consider putting it into context Millennials might understand: imagine having an issue with your Netflix account, submitting a trouble ticket and waiting an hour for someone to contact you. Would you tolerate that timeline?

Also communicate some of the intangible consequences of being late: diminished trust, colleague resentment, and looking less responsible as a professional.

5. Discipline

Every employee but especially the early-career Millennials will have varied learning curves when it comes to correcting their tardiness. Some will only need a subtle reminder while others will need disciplinary action.

Disciplinary action could include:

  • Requiring they make up the time.
  • Docking their pay.
  • Decreasing their bonus.

Enforcing steeper disciplinary action may be warranted if their behavior has negatively impacted the bottomline, the company culture, or a client relationship. (Read this for how to terminate a Millennial.)

6. Acknowledge Improvement

If the Millennial employee’s behavior improves, make it a priority to acknowledge it. (Read this for how to deliver recognition to Millennials.)

(This is 1 of the 47 strategies Ryan shares in his new book, The Millennial Manual: The Complete How-To Guide to Manage, Develop, and Engage Millennials at Work.)

This article was originally posted on Ryan’s Inc.com column, Next Generation Insights.

Reprinted with permission.

People Attract People

dicktaylor
Dick Taylor

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By:  Dick Taylor,  CRMC/CDMC
Dick Taylor Blog
https://dicktaylorblog.com/

One of my favorite activities each Memorial Day Weekend is to listen to WABC Rewound streamed over Rewound Radio. What makes this weekend so special is that people from all over the world are listening to the stream at the same time. It’s a coming together of people of all ages to celebrate one of the greatest radio stations America ever produced.

Why WABC Rewound is So Popular

This year, I streamed WABC Rewound driving back to Virginia after spending a couple of weeks in my home state of Massachusetts. Over 7-hours and four states, the stream via my iPhone7 pumped through my Honda Accord’s premium 7-speaker, 270-watt audio system was rich, full and continuous without buffering or interference of any kind. That all by itself is something to note. Streaming audio today is becoming seamless.

But it wasn’t the music that attracted me, though the records are the “music of my life” from my days in high school, college and as a disc jockey. No, what attracts me – and everyone else that faithfully tunes in each year – are the personalities.

Herb Oscar Anderson, Bob Dayton, Dan Ingram, Ron Lundy, Bruce Morrow, Charlie Greer, Bob Lewis, Chuck Leonard, Johnny Donovan, Harry Harrison and George Michael, plus the newscasters that delivered news every hour.

We are attracted to the people. People we grew up with.

The New Yorker magazine wrote back in 1965 that listeners to WABC were part of the WABC family. We were “cousins” of Cousin Brucie. We were part of the Ingram tribe as he called us “Kemosabe.”

Mornings went “all the way with HOA” as New York’s morning Mayor Herb Oscar Anderson started our day before Harry Harrison moved from WMCA to WABC.

Contests, Features & Promotions About People

WABC invited listeners to vote for their “Principal of the Year” (16-million votes cast in 1964), mail in for a “Kissin’ Cousin Card” or a “Kemosabe Card” (drawing in 150,000 requests in a single week).

Herb Oscar singing “Hello Again” live on the radio and reading lost dog announcements, celebrating birthdays.

Each personality became a member of the family. Your family. And like a member of the family, you took them everywhere you went. To the lake, on a picnic, in your car, to wake up with or go to sleep with. They were companions and we were part of their community.

Father Peter Gregory

“Without people, there wouldn’t be a priesthood,” was the often-heard proclamation of Father Peter Gregory of St. Charles Church in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Father Peter has been the pastor of St. Charles for nearly three decades. “The church is people,” he told a reporter who interviewed him on the eve of his retirement.

I bring up Father Peter because at a time when many churches in Pittsfield have closed their doors due to a lack of followers, St. Charles is doing quite well.

It’s not the most glamorous of structures – other churches in the city I might rate more inspirational – and it’s not in the best neighborhood. No, what it has had is a spiritual leader that believed in people and whom people believed in right back.

A Mount Rushmore Sized Opportunity for Radio

I love reading the weekly Mid-Week Motivator articles from a good friend and former consultant of some of the radio stations I managed, Tim Moore.

Recently Tim asked “Why is Talent Development in Neutral?”

He wrote that his life’s education seems to have been about understanding the challenges and concepts of what it takes to be a winner. It meant he would constantly be looking for character and excellence in people who hadn’t found it yet.

The irony about today’s radio, Tim says, is “glaring opportunity, constricted by the inability or lack of will on the part of many companies and their leaders to insist on the culture of better.”

Air talent goes un-coached while radio has a huge opportunity to build relationships with its listeners. Building the same kind of bond I had with the personalities of WABC, WKBW, WTRY, WPTR, WBZ, WRKO, WDRC, WBEC, WBRK, WLS, WCFL and so many more.

Focus Groups

Over the years, I’ve been to many diary reviews and a few focus groups. What you see are the attraction of radio listeners to radio personalities.

While a particular format may be what initially attracts a listener to a radio station, it’s the radio personality that is the glue that will cement the listener’s loyalty.

Tim says, “It’s the personality of a station that locks-in listeners’ interest and daily habit.” “The implications are simple, obvious, yet largely ignored: without better talent (defined as more relatable, interesting, and reciprocal people on the radio) we are treading water,” says Tim.

Who Influenced Dan Ingram, The Real Don Steele, Dale Dorman or…?

Most radio people my age grew up with the most talented and engaging radio personalities to grace the airwaves of American radio. They were our teachers. They were available for us to listen to and mentor under 24/7, 365-days a year.

In addition to them, we had program directors – many of them off-air – who coached us and inspired us to be better.

I’ve often wondered about the iconic radio personalities that did it first. Who did they learn from? How did they become the engaging, relatable, interesting personalities that attracted our ears like metal to a magnet?

And can a talent voice-tracked over multiple radio stations ever be as compelling to not just listeners but to the next generation to want to pursue radio as a career?

Again, Father Peter understood his church’s most valuable asset, its youth. “It’s the kids and youth who are the future of our church,” he said. “I’m now dealing with kids whose parents I had as kids.”

The Community Band

Once upon a time, every community in America had at least one town band. Most of them are long gone.

When I was managing a radio cluster in Lancaster, Pennsylvania I came to know and love the New Holland Band of New Holland, Pennsylvania.

The band was not only strong and vibrant, but performed at a level that would have made John Phillip Sousa proud. Its concerts are very well attended and it has produced some of this country’s finest musicians, some of whom now perform as part of the President’s band.

Why did the New Holland Band not just survive but continue to thrive? It understood it’s all about people. The band’s members are made up of a diverse group of professional, semi-professional and student musicians. The oldest member of the band has been a member since 1959 and the newest member since 2016. It’s this blending of youth with experience and wisdom that keeps the New Holland Band fresh, contemporary and relevant.

Junior Achievement

It was the initiative of one of my hometown radio stations (WBEC) that convinced the Junior Achievement to create a JA Radio Company.

Junior Achievement was founded in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1919 by Theodore Vail of AT&T, Horace Moses of Strathmore Paper Company and Massachusetts Senator Winthrop Murray Crane (who’s family paper company, Crane and Company, makes the paper all U.S. currency is printed on).

The JA website states: “Junior Achievement is the nation’s largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future and make smart academic and economic choices. Junior Achievement’s programs—in the core content areas of work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy—ignite the spark in young people to experience and realize the opportunities and realities of work and life in the 21st century. Our Purpose: Junior Achievement inspires and prepares young people to succeed in a global economy.”

WBEC’s management realized that getting high school students actively involved with the radio station would engage their parents, siblings, families and friends too. Many of them who owned local businesses. It was both mentoring a new generation of radio broadcasters as well as leveraging the people attract people principle.

Human Development

As Tim Moore says, “Human development is the essence of life. Weak excuses such as ‘we don’t have the time to develop talent’ are just chin boogie.”

All my radio life, I’ve invested my energies in the development of people. Many of them today are owners and managers of their own broadcast operations.

I’m also proud to have spent the past seven years of my life as a broadcast professor paying-it-forward to a new generation of broadcasters.

Radio is a people business.

It will never attract people to its product like it once did without a serious commitment to talent development.

Reprinted by permission.

Dick Taylor has been “Radio Guy” all his life and is currently a professor of broadcasting at the School of Journalism & Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Dick shares his thoughts on radio and media frequenty at https://dicktaylorblog.com.  

How to Attract Millennials With a Compelling Recruitment Video

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

Ryan Jenkins

By: Ryan Jenkins
Next Generation Speaker / Inc.com Columnist

Finding talent for your organization is an ongoing process. It’s even more ongoing  today as Baby Boomers retire and Millennials change jobs in record numbers.

As stated in my previous article, How to Attract Millennial Workers in 2 Simple Steps:

What are Millennials looking for when considering a job?

  • The No. 1 thing Millennials want to know about a company is its “culture and values,” followed by “perks and benefits,” and “employee perspectives of the company.”
  • The top obstacle to Millennials accepting a job is “not knowing what the company is like.”

A compelling and informative recruiting video can satisfy both of the above Millennial needs when it comes to considering a job. Here are fifteen elements to include in your recruitment video in order to effectively attract the right Millennial talent.

  1. Don’t tell, show. 
    Video is the preferred method of consumption for the Millennial generation. Showcase what it looks like to work at your company.
  2. Infuse authenticity. 
    Give the viewer a genuine sense of the workspace, company culture, and employee perspectives.
  3. Showcase your growth. 
    Millennials are interested in becoming an integral part of something that’s going somewhere. Use interesting visuals or comparisons to showcase your company’s recent growth.
  4. Expose your culture. 
    Spend more time emphasizing the company culture than explaining your product or service. Millennials put a premium on culture.
  5. Flaunt your employees.
    Millennials want to see who they’d be working alongside. The more diverse and creative the team…the better. Ditch any clip art and stock video and just use your real employees.
  6. Unveil the lifestyle.
    Millennials often choose a city before they choose a job. Show the community amenities of your hiring city. Highlight the eateries, coffee shops, bars, public transportation, venues, etc.
  7. Reveal the office.
    Highlight the innovate workspaces and work perks (pets at work, adjustable desks, cafeterias, game rooms, etc.).
  8. Depict an actual day. 
    Show what it looks like going to work, who they are going to meet there, a typical desk, the elevator they will use, where they will park, how they will collaborate, and where meetings are held. The easier they can visualize themselves at your organization, the easier their decision.
  9. Show off technology. 
    Millennials desire an innovative environment to quench their tech dependence. Show employees interacting with the various pieces of technology through the office.
  10. Exhibit social perks. 
    Millennials are looking for community as much as they are a job. Highlight your community outreach, office sport teams, and parties.
  11. Feature your leaders. 
    Allow Millennials to see or hear from senior leaders inside the organization. Highly visible leaders give Millennials the impression of a flatter organization, which they prefer.
  12. Get quirky. 
    No Millennial dreams of working for a stuffy organization. Do not make the video too corporate and robotic. Find ways to inject some quirkiness.
  13. Short video. 
    Attention spans are shortening at alarming rates. Create a 1-1:30min recruiting intro video and then serve up other longer videos (if necessary) for those interested in learning more about your organization.
  14. Compelling music. 
    Your video’s music can make or break the video. Music can demonstrate your relevance, innovation, and the pace of your organization.
  15. Visible call to action. 
    Make sure viewers know exactly what their next step should be (ex: visit www.xyz.com/hiring to apply or text APPLY to 12121). Make it clear and visible. Place it at the end of the video and in the video description.

(This is 1 of the 47 strategies shared in Ryan’s new book, The Millennial Manual: The Complete How-To Guide to Manage, Develop, and Engage Millennials at Work.)

Reprinted with permission.

Radio Help Wanted Ads for Salespeople

dicktaylor
Dick Taylor

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By:  Dick Taylor,  CRMC/CDMC
Dick Taylor Blog
https://dicktaylorblog.com/

I manage the “Radio/TV/Digital Sales Help Wanted” bulletin board at my university. I’ve been doing it for the past 7 years. I’m sometimes sad to post the help wanted ads sent to me because of how they characterize the position they seek to fill.

SUPERMAN or SUPERWOMAN Wanted

Most of the ads use the same old tired clichés. They want someone “dynamic & energetic” for an “amazing opportunity” with a broadcasting company.

Must be able to sell radio ads for top dollar, create dynamic marketing plans that utilize our company’s broadcast, digital and NTR properties.

If the ad is for a management position, then I often see that in addition to the above, the person must also be good at managing collections, hiring, training, motivating good people and carry a list while managing operations to meet or exceed the goals set by the company. In addition, we want our people to be integrally involved in every aspect of our wonderful community. (I’m sorry, but I think Superman/woman is busy with more important stuff.)

If the ad mentions anything at all about pay and benefits, it might simply say we offer an excellent compensation program.

It’s NOT About YOU

What these ads all miss are they say nothing to the person reading the ad about what they might be interested in. Radio station ads only talk about what the station wants.

You are marketing your radio station to a potential employee. Where is the “wining & dining” of a potential candidate?

I hear from radio stations all the time that they have trouble finding good sales people. No wonder when you make the job sound as attractive as digging a ditch. We’re in show business.

Attracting Better Employees

The unfortunate part of today’s job ads is they tend to be used more as a filter to keep people out rather than a net to designed to scoop up the best candidates.

Not every job requires having a bachelor’s degree but unfortunately businesses use this requirement as a filter to keep people from applying.

Now I teach at a university and we award bachelor degrees, so you might think I would sing the academy line about getting one. But I don’t. I know some of the people in my classes who will be the best sales people are not necessarily the best students. The best sales people are high in EQ not IQ.

Colleges award students who have high IQ’s with distinction.

For radio stations hiring sales talent, what you really want are people who have high EQ or Emotion Intelligence.

Stanford University did a study to find out what their best students had in common. Best in Stanford’s eyes was a student that became a company CEO and earned a high income.

When the results came back, they were shocked that it all boiled down to two qualities: their most successful students were in the bottom half of their class and were all popular (High EQ).

What’s In It for the Candidate?

Instead of writing an ad to screen people out, why not write an ad to open the door to let people in. Write what’s in it for person reading the ad.

The person reading your ad should envision themselves working in your radio station and being successful.

Why are You Hiring?

Before you even write the ad, you really need to understand why you are hiring in the first place. What do you want the new person to accomplish in this position and how will you measure success? What is your WHY?

In today’s world of help wanted advertising on the internet, length is not the problem it was back in the newspaper days. So sell your company’s story and the job in your ad to the best candidates out there and as Valerie Geller says in her programming seminars “don’t be boring.” Budget for the sales person you WANT to have on your team, not for the least amount of money you want to pay. If you want a top performer, then offer a comp package for one.

Sample Ad

Marketing Opportunity of a Lifetime

We’re expanding our radio marketing department.

The person we hire will be using our radio, social media,

internet streaming and events

to create successful marketing campaigns

for our community’s outstanding local businesses.

We offer mentoring, training and will invest in your success.

You will be paid (salary amount here) per month salary plus

(percentage here) percent commission on sales from dollar one sold.

Benefits plan includes medical, dental, vision, vacation time and holidays.

We can’t wait to hear your story of past successes

and learning how you believe working at WXXX

will propel your career to new heights.

EEO/m-f employer

Note: This ad will attract a different type of candidate than most of the ads that are sent to me to post on our jobs board at the university. Come on folks, we’re in sales. Sell yourself.

Reprinted by permission.

Dick Taylor has been “Radio Guy” all his life and is currently a professor of broadcasting at the School of Journalism & Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Dick shares his thoughts on radio and media frequenty at https://dicktaylorblog.com.  

Radio’s Best Feature

dicktaylor
Dick Taylor

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By:  Dick Taylor,  CRMC/CDMC
Dick Taylor Blog
https://dicktaylorblog.com/

The one constant in life is change.

What makes our world different than the world we grew up in is the rate of change in technology.

Adoption rates for technology over time, according to the U.S. Census, shows us that it took about 45 years for 25% of Americans to adopt electricity, 35 years for 25% of Americans to adopt the wired telephone, about 32 years for 25% of Americans to adopt radio, 25 years for TV, 15 years for personal computers, 12 years for mobile phones, eight years for the Internet, and about about five years for 25% of Americans to adopt smartphones.

Nearly nine in ten Americans today are on the Internet and 77% of Americans now own a smartphone, according to Pew Research.

K.I.S.S.

Most people who have any sales training at all know all about “KISS.” Some say it means “Keep It Simple Stupid” and others will tell you it means “Keep it Short & Simple.”

But either way the message is the same: “keep things simple.”

“You have to work hard to get your thinking clean and make it simple.”
Steve Jobs

Quite possibly our biggest challenge in the 21st Century is to keep up with the rate of accelerating change.

The More Things Change, the More They Are the Same

I’m sure you’ve heard this phrase uttered more than once in your lifetime. Every generation has thought that the rate of change was beyond their ability to cope. A couple of centuries ago Henry David Thoreau told his contemporaries to “Simplify, simplify, simplify.”

Technology – especially information technology, the basis of our social networks – is speeding up exponentially. The famous Moore’s Law predicted this for computer chip development.

Exponential growth rate is an evolutionary process.

In his book “The Singularity Is Near” Raymond Kurzweil showed how civilizations advance through building on the ideas and innovations of previous generations, a positive feedback loop of advancement.

Each new generation is able to improve upon the innovations of the past with increasing speed.

Kurzweil wrote in 2001 that every decade our overall rate of progress was doubling, “We won’t experience 100 years of progress in the 21st Century – it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today’s rate).”

Only 17 years into the 21st Century and it feels like Kurzweil nailed it with his prediction.

It Still Takes 9 Months to Make a Baby

While it’s true so much of our world is uncontrollably speeding up, we are still human beings and we still pretty much move at the same pace biologically as we always have. Technology doesn’t transform our human nature.

Our need for love, touch, companionship and community will always be part of our humanity no matter what technology brings.

Radio Reaches 93% of Adult Americans Every Week

The latest Nielsen Audio research reports “radio leads all other platforms when it comes to weekly reach (93%) among adult consumers – and with new insights available to compare radio to other platforms on a regular basis, it’s clear that radio is an integral part of media consumption for millions of Americans.”

Great radio makes a human connection, engages its community and is a companion.

Radio’s best feature in a world of complex technology is that it’s simple to use.

It’s that simplicity, I believe, that makes it the #1 media favorite.

Reprinted by permission.

Dick Taylor has been “Radio Guy” all his life and is currently a professor of broadcasting at the School of Journalism & Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Dick shares his thoughts on radio and media frequenty at https://dicktaylorblog.com.  

A Day in May

Tim Moore

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By:  Tim Moore,
Managing Partner,
Audience Development Group

This month marks the sixth anniversary of the largest natural disaster visited on the American landscape in the new Century. At 5:34 p.m. on Sunday, May 22, 2011, an EF5 tornado’s 200 mile per hour winds cut a mile-wide swath through Joplin (Missouri’s fourth largest metro) killing 158 and injuring more than a thousand.

In its aftermath only Zimmer Radio’s in-house radar and engineering foresight linked the market with the outside world. Three TV stations and other radio companies were decommissioned by the tornado. The following is a verbatim e-mail between two members of Zimmer’s highly respected engineering team 48 hours after the storm:

From: David Obergoenner to Morgan Grammar Date: 24 May 2011 Subject: Joplin 11:39 PM

Thanks, Morgan. As of this afternoon we still had two staff members missing. Many of our people including the air staff lost their homes, cars, everything. But there they were, all day today, on the air, helping other hurting folks via radio. We have such a great staff!!! Much of our broadcast day was taking calls from people trying to find friends and family…and helping folks find food and shelter. Some of the calls tore my heart out. So many good people in that town…

We’ve brought in a couple of RV’s for staff members to use who don’t have homes anymore…or theirs’ are too badly damaged to safely return to. All of our stations were on simulcast wall to wall; with weather coverage from an hour before the storm hit Joplin. We knew it was going to be a bad one. 6 of our 7 signals stayed on the air without missing a beat through the storm. Zimmer stations are about the only thing left on radio or TV.

Our 5 kw AM took a direct lightening hit as the storm blew through and was off the air until about 4am when Mel got it fixed. The BE AM-6a was still fine. The generators at all the sites saved our butts again. The tornado just missed our 1,000 foot Joplin Super Tower (with 3 of our FM’s on it) and just missed our studio complex by a couple of blocks. The winds at our studios were so strong it tore out several trees near our parking lot. Several of our staff’s cars were parked there and it really tore them up too.

I have no idea how our STL tower survived that…I guess that ERI tower I insisted on is pretty tough. We still haven’t been able to get to our old location which also has a 400 foot tower. Mel says he saw the tower but not sure if the building is still standing. Our TV tenant has been off the air since the storm hit, as has most of the TV here. That’s about where we are this evening. Joplin will not be back to normal for a VERY long time.

Zimmer had previously installed actual radar when they launched their News -Talk KZRG. Operations Manager Chad Elliot had fortuitously worked out a text warning system with some Kansas Sheriff’s departments to the west. Elliot came immediately to his facility on learning a massive multiple-vortex storm was making up over Kansas and headed for Joplin. He alerted local emergency departments and a large local high school with commencement ceremonies that afternoon! The damage was beyond description, including the 10-story St. Johns Medical Complex, actually deformed over a foot on its foundation; only part of the $2.8 billion in damages.

In the weeks that followed, Zimmer radio was appropriately hailed as a savior for so many who, thanks to the advanced warning, were able to take shelter. The company was visited by countless agencies including the NAB and many broadcasters who simply wanted to know “how they accomplished it.”

The answer was of course foresight and an investment in “overbuilt” facilities including their in-house radar. As for Zimmer’s human assets, it’s fair to say they were priceless.

 

 

My oh MAYA

dicktaylor
Dick Taylor

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By:  Dick Taylor,  CRMC/CDMC
Dick Taylor Blog
https://dicktaylorblog.com/

Have you ever heard of the MAYA Principle? Neither had I. But I saw an article in The Atlantic titled “The Four-Letter Code to Selling Just About Anything, what makes things cool” and I wondered if there might be some application for radio.

MAYA

MAYA stands for “Most Advanced. Yet Acceptable.”

It means that as you design your product or business for the future you need to keep it in balance with your users’ present. In other words, as Tony Bennett might have sang, “It don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing.

This 1931 jazz composition by Duke Ellington was given the MAYA treatment by Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga in 2014. Proving anything that’s old can be new again.

Age of Distraction

I doubt anyone would take issue with the statement that the 21st Century is the “Age of Distraction.” I also am sure that when your computer, smartphone, tablet, software says you have an update, you sigh a big sigh and utter something like “Uff da. Fina mina doh.” (Translation: Oh boy. Here we go again.)

Sequels

Hollywood and television have long understood MAYA. To date we have twelve Star Wars movies, ten Halloween movies and CSI grew from Las Vegas to Miami and New York. I’m sure you can think of many others.

The reason is each is new but familiar.

Change

We humans are a fickle lot.

We hate change and we love change.

What we really like is what Derek Thompson calls “the simulation of innovation, which pushes the right buttons for novelty while remaining fundamentally conventional.”

________ R Us

Remember when Toys R Us had everyone copying their success by calling themselves “R Us” too. The iPod, iPhone, iPad had lots of imitators as well, as if putting a small “i” in front of your name made you cool.

Well, it can.

Ask Bob Pittman.

He changed Clear Channel Radio to Clear Channel Media & Entertainment before abandoning the old CC brand to adopt its successful App brand for the entire company. Voila, iHeartMedia.

“iHeartMedia reflects our commitment to being the media company that provides the most entertainment to the most engaged audiences wherever they go, with more content and more events in more places on more devices,” said Bob Pittman, Chairman and CEO of iHeartMedia, Inc.

Car Radios

I recently drove a Toyota Rav4 rental for a week in Florida. The radio was a trial. Thank goodness it had a volume and a tuning knob. Everything else was activated by the touch screen or the myriad of buttons on the steering wheel. (Don’t get me started about the HD reception.)

Laurence Harrison, Director of Digital Radio UK did a presentation at the Connected Car Show in 2016 on what the consumer wanted in their car radio. Here’s some of what he told his audience.

  • 77% want LIVE radio.
  • 82% said a radio was a MUST HAVE.
  • 69% said if they could only chose one entertainment option it would be radio.
  • Digital is the future of radio.
  • Want better radios.
  • Listener centered design.
  • Metadata to make it smart.

Summing it all up, consumers want a car radio that’s broadcast digital, with a simple, easy-to-use interface (that’s familiar) and an app-like experience that is safe according to Harrison.

Raymond Loewy

The MAYA principle was the design approach brainchild of Raymond Loewy. You may not know his name but you know his work. Loewy designed the Coca Cola bottle, the logo for Air Force One, the logos for Shell, USPS and Greyhound. He also designed some of the iconic cars of the 40s – 60s and so much more.

Loewy understood us fickle humans. We want change, just not too quickly. He was a master of giving consumers a more advanced design but not more advanced than what they were able to deal with.

Apple

Steve Jobs was good as applying the principle of MAYA with the introduction of the iPod and its evolution. The iPod over time removed most of its buttons creating the entrance for the iPhone.

Apple wasn’t about to repeat the disaster it had with the Newton, a product that was more advanced than consumers were ready for. Google Glass is another such product that made too big a leap.

Knowing Your Customer’s Current Skill Level

For the consumer to embrace change, change must be introduced gradually over time.

The Air Pods might seem like a contradiction to this but when the iPhone7 introduced them and took away the headphone jack the percentage of wireless headphone sales to wired ones had already crossed a tipping point. iPhone7 sales are an indicator that it was MAYA time for this innovation. Apple didn’t have to explain the concept to its consumers, they were already there.

Consumers are not going to spend their time and money on trying to learn your product if there’s a product out there that is easier to use and more familiar to them.

And, that is the challenge for radio.

Reprinted by permission.

Dick Taylor has been “Radio Guy” all his life and is currently a professor of broadcasting at the School of Journalism & Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Dick shares his thoughts on radio and media frequenty at https://dicktaylorblog.com.