Category Archives: MAPB

WDET Welcomes Journalist Emery King on May 17

Emery King

WDET-FM (Detroit) is presenting “Essential Conversation with Emery King hosted by Ann Delisi” at the Detroit Historical Museum  on May 17.  The event is a fund-raiser for the public radio station.

Delisi is a program host at WDET and also works with former NBC White House Correspondent and former WDIV News Anchor Emery King and his production company, Emery King Communications. For the past 10 years they have worked on countless productions together, met with everyone from doctors to legislators and at one time, they shared an office down the hall from Detroit Medical Center CEO (and now Detroit Mayor), Mike Duggan.

Delisi will put her interview skills to work and interview her boss, Emery King, for the first Essential Conversation of 2017. They will talk about Mr. King’s time covering the White House, the press, race, his work with the Michigan Film Industry, Mayor Mike Duggan, Mr. King’s incredible personal story and how he and Ann Delisi came to work together.

Ticket and event information is available here.

Michigan Radio Reporter Kate Wells named Young Journalist of the Year

Via Steve Chrypinski, Michigan Radio

Michigan Radio reporter Kate Wells with News Director Vincent Duffy (L) and General Manager Steve Schram.

The Detroit Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) has named Michigan Radio reporter Kate Wells the ‘Young Journalist of the Year.’ The award was presented at the Detroit SPJ’s annual banquet April 19.

In naming Wells ‘Young Journalist of the Year,’ the judges called her a “multi-talented journalist” who shows “research, organization [and] compelling storytelling,” and deemed her work “inspiring 21st century journalism.”

Kate Wells has been with Michigan Radio since 2012 and has won numerous awards for her reporting.

Michigan Radio’s senior political analyst and commentator Jack Lessenberry was also honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the annual SPJ awards banquet. In addition to his work at Michigan Radio, Lessenberry is also head of the journalism faculty at Wayne State University and a columnist for the Metro Times and the Toledo Blade.

The Detroit Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists recognizes the area’s top print, online, radio and television journalists. Winners are selected by a jury of veteran metro Detroit journalists from candidates nominated by their peers. Michigan Radio reporter Lindsey Smith received the Young Journalist of the Year award in 2014, with Jennifer Guerra winning in 2008.

Public Media Impact Award Nominations are Open!

View More: http://benjamindavidphotography.pass.us/mabsummer2016This year marks the 32nd year of honoring Michigan’s public broadcasters with the MAPB Public Media Impact Award.

Two awards will be presented – one award for Donors and one award for Professionals – for their contribution to public broadcasting in Michigan. The awards will be presented at the Annual Awards Banquet as part of the August 2017 MAB Advocacy Conference & Annual Meeting at Crystal Mountain Resort in Thompsonville, MI, which is attended by owners and operators of broadcast stations, lawmakers and other dignitaries.

Purpose

  • To recognize outstanding individuals involved in public broadcasting for their innovation and creativity.
  • To inspire others involved in public broadcasting to greater achievement in the field of public radio and television.
  • To increase awareness of public broadcasting and the contributions talented individuals make to the industry statewide.

Eligibility
Donors and Professionals involved in Michigan public radio or television are eligible for nomination. Nominations can be made by colleagues, supervisors and/or station managers. Activities for which the person is nominated may be long-term, to recognize lifetime contributions to public broadcasting, or more recent, to reflect a concentrated period of achievement.

Nomination Process
Deadline for nominations and supporting material (i.e. letters of support, photos and videos) is Wednesday, June 7, 2017.

Visit the MAPB Award Page here for more information and to access the online nomination form.

 

Interlochen Public Radio Presents “Show & Tell”

As part of its recent fund drive, Interlochen Public Radio Executive Director Peter Payette wanted to offer listeners a chance to get to know their public radio hosts a little better.  So, he hosted an online round of Show and Tell on Facebook.  IPR staffer Kate Botello explained the subculture of Unicornos. Aaron Selbig showed how he prevents boredom at work. Morgan Springer suggested that IPR staff aren’t as funny as they used to be.  And wait, there’s more!

IPR’s David Cassleman shows their disciplined approach to avoiding clichés in their writing:


See more of Peter’s interviews with the IPR staff here.

Michigan Radio Staff Accepts Scripps Howard Award

Via Steve Chrypinski, Michigan Radio 

Michigan Radio staff accepting the Scripps Howard Award. (L-R) Zoe Clark, Rebecca Williams, Vincent Duffy, Steve Carmody

Members of Michigan Radio’s news team were in Cincinnati April 12 to accept the station’s first-ever Scripps Howard Award for the station’s on-going coverage of the Flint water crisis.

The Scripps Howard – Jack R. Howard Award for Radio Coverage honors the best in-depth and investigative reporting of a single event or issue that was broadcast or covered online by a radio station or radio network.

Of the station’s coverage of the Flint water crisis, which continues to uncover problems with the city’s tainted water, the judges wrote: “…a gripping, comprehensive account of local and state government malfeasance. Collectively, the station’s efforts are an inspiring work of public service that put necessary pressure on responsible authorities to do the right thing for a community with few resources of its own.”

Michigan Radio’s Flint water crisis team includes Reporter/Producer Lindsey Smith and Steve Carmody, Environment Report Host/Reporter Rebecca Williams, Digital Media Director Mark Brush and Senior Editor Sarah Hulett.

The Scripps Howard Foundation considered more than 860 submissions from across the country for the 2016 Scripps Howard Awards, which were established in 1953 to recognize outstanding print, broadcast and online journalism in 15 categories.

You can view video of the award presentation and Rebecca Williams’ acceptance speech below.

MAPB Partners with WGVU for LZ Michigan


The Michigan Association of Public Broadcasters (MAPB) has partnered with WGVU Public Media to present LZ Michigan, an event scheduled for September 23, 2017 at Fifth Third Ballpark in Grand Rapids.  The event will honor all veterans, including those who were killed or declared missing in action.

In addition to MAPB and WGVU Public Media, PBS Stories of Service, ArtPrize and the West Michigan Whitecaps are coming together to sponsor the event, which is expected to draw hundreds of veterans from around the state.

“It is important and necessary to remember, honor and celebrate our community’s veterans and their families,” said Michael T. Walenta, WGVU Public Media general manager. “Since the success and tremendous turnout at the first LZ Michigan in 2010, I have been continually asked when we were going to host another program. We are privileged to once again bring this event to West Michigan.”

Walenta announced new partnerships with ArtPrize and the Human Hug Project, a national movement out of Nashville that is raising awareness of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Todd Herring, director of communications for ArtPrize, said a veterans art competition will be held during the week leading up to LZ Michigan 2017, along with a preview screening of the film, “The Vietnam War,” by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.

Ian Michael, co-founder of the Human Hug Project and a Marine Corps veteran, said volunteers with the group have hugged more than 20,000 veterans as they travel to VA hospitals across the country. “We offer a hug, a warm embrace, to remind veterans they are heroes,” said Michael. “We hope a hug can help unlock their stories because we need to celebrate their stories.”

The day-long September 23 program will include speakers, musical entertainment, military displays, historical artifacts and the WGVU Real Oldies Car and Motorcycle Show.

For more information, visit www.lzmichigan.org.

Who Do You Know That Has Impacted Public Media?

View More: http://benjamindavidphotography.pass.us/mabsummer2016Nominations are now open for the MAPB Public Media Impact Award.  This year marks the 32nd year of honoring Michigan’s public broadcasters.

Two awards will be presented – one award for Donors and one award for Professionals – for their contribution to public broadcasting in Michigan. The awards will be presented at the Annual Awards Banquet as part of the August 2017 Advocacy Conference & Annual Meeting at Crystal Mountain Resort in Thompsonville, MI, which is attended by owners and operators of broadcast stations, lawmakers and other dignitaries.

Purpose

  • To recognize outstanding individuals involved in public broadcasting for their innovation and creativity.
  • To inspire others involved in public broadcasting to greater achievement in the field of public radio and television.
  • To increase awareness of public broadcasting and the contributions talented individuals make to the industry statewide.

Eligibility
Donors and Professionals involved in Michigan public radio or television are eligible for nomination. Nominations can be made by colleagues, supervisors and/or station managers. Activities for which the person is nominated may be long-term, to recognize lifetime contributions to public broadcasting, or more recent, to reflect a concentrated period of achievement.

Nomination Process
The Deadline for nominations and supporting material (i.e. letters of support, photos and videos) is Wednesday, June 7, 2017.

Visit the MAPB Award Page here for more information and to access the online nomination form.

Increasing Public Awareness Through Op-Ed Columns


In light of President Trump’s proposed budget, which would eliminate funding for public media and the arts, there has been a number of Op-Ed columns appearing in major newspapers around the country in support of public television and radio. Your MAB/MAPB News Briefs spotted a few and thought we’d share:

In the April 5, 2017 issue of the New York Times, Op-Ed Contributor Stanley McChrystal is author of Save PBS. It Makes Us Safer.   McChrystal writes: “Public broadcasting makes our nation smarter, stronger and, yes, safer. It’s a small public investment that pays huge dividends for Americans. And it shouldn’t be pitted against spending more on improving our military. That’s a false choice. This might seem like an unlikely position for me, a 34-year combat veteran. But it’s a view that has been shaped by my career leading brave men and women who thrive and win when they are both strong and smart. My experience has taught me that education, trusted institutions and civil discourse are the lifeblood of a great nation.”  Read the entire column here.

In the April 5, 2017 issue of the Louisville Courier-Journal, Louisville Public Media President Michael Skoler writes:
“Federal money provides just a bit of seed support for stations and the transmitters and equipment that allow programs to be shared across the nation. Those dollars are just six percent of the Louisville Public Media budget.  Federal money provides less than seven percent of PBS’s budget and less than one percent of NPR’s budget. The free market does many things well. Building community and a shared American experience is not one of them. Shared experience, by definition, is not elitist, it’s owned by everyone.”  Read Who needs PBS, NPR? Everyone here.

In the March 29, 2017 issue of the Los Angeles Times, Op-Ed Contributor Jennifer Ferro (General Manager of Public Radio Station KCRW) notes: “Public radio in particular is a critical part of the nation’s communications infrastructure. While commercial radio has cut costs by consolidating its operations into one or two main hubs, public radio stations are staffed and operated live. In rural areas, public radio stations often are the only live broadcast outlet. As in Marfa (Texas) during the wildfires, those stations provide vital information to their broadcast areas, and without federal funding, this crucial community function would surely disappear.”  Read Trump’s public broadcasting cuts will zero out live, local, real news here.

In the March 17, 2017 issue of the San Bernardino Sun, Bruce Baron, Chancellor of the San Bernardino Community College District, which operates public stations KVCR-FM-TV, authored a Op-Ed titled Federal defunding of PBS, NPR and KVCR could hurt our kids.  Baron: “Public television also provides 120,000 trusted and reliable learning tools for teachers, parents and home-schoolers nationwide. From Wild Kratts to Nature to NOVA, students and learners of all ages are exposed to the wonders of our world and the thrills of discovery and invention that can open doors to careers in high-demand science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.”  Read more here.

Have an Op-Ed piece to share with MAB/MAPB News Brief readers?  Send a link to dkelley@michmab.com.

FCC to Change Noncommercial Ownership Form

Commission to eliminate need for social security numbers from board members of noncommercial licensees for Biennial Ownership Report.

David Oxenford - Color
David Oxenford

By: David Oxenford, Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP
www.broadcastlawblog.com

Last week, we wrote about two of the three broadcast items to be considered at the FCC meeting on April 20. We wrote here about the draft order to restore the UHF discount and here about the relaxation of the restrictions on fund-raising for third parties by noncommercial stations. The third item, also related to noncommercial licensees, is the resolution of the long-simmering dispute about whether or not to require that those individuals with attributable interests in noncommercial broadcast stations – officers and board members – to provide their Social Security Numbers or other personal information to the FCC to obtain an FCC Registration Number – an FRN. The draft order released last week indicates that the FCC will eliminate that requirement at its April 20 meeting.

The obligation to obtain an FRN was adopted so that the FCC could comprehensively track the ownership of broadcast stations and determine the interests of individual parties across the broadcast media nationwide. This was principally done for purposes of assessing the diversity of ownership of the media – including by minorities and women. By making each attributable owner get their own FRN, interests across the broadcast media landscape could be tracked with greater precision. However, objections were raised when the FCC proposed to apply this obligation to noncommercial broadcasters, requiring that officers and board members provide their Social Security Number or other personal information to obtain an FRN. Despite these objections, the previous Commission ordered noncommercial broadcasters to provide this information, going so far as to suggest that attributable interest holders who did not provide the information necessary to obtain an FRN could be sanctioned. See our articles here and here. The current FCC under Chairman Pai rescinded the decision of the Media Bureau upholding the obligation (see our post here) – leading to the draft order to be considered at the April 20 meeting.

Noncommercial broadcasters have argued that this information is not as necessary as for commercial broadcasters in assessing diversity, as noncommercial stations don’t have owners in the traditional sense of the word. Their officers and board members don’t have an economic interest in the business success of the station. In fact, those with attributable interests in noncommercial stations often don’t become officers or directors because they are interested in radio or television at all, but instead because they are interested in a noncommercial entity’s broader purpose. For instance, a member of the board of a state university may become a board member because of his or her interest in some academic department, or because of the athletic teams at the university and not even know when appointed to the board that among the university’s holdings is a broadcast station. Some board members may become members by being an elected official – e.g. state governors are often ex-officio members of state university boards. The fear is that, by requiring that these individuals provide personally sensitive information, they may be discouraged from participating in these nonprofit endeavors. A majority of the current Commission appears to have accepted that reasoning and has now teed up the concept of allowing noncommercial stations to obtain Special Use FRNs (“SUFRN”) for these individuals – which will not require personally identifiable information or Social Security Numbers.

The FCC did note, however, that these individuals need to use the same SUFRN for any broadcast interests that they may have. So if an individual sits on the board of multiple broadcast licensees (e.g. the governor of a state who may be on the board of several state universities that are the licensee of broadcast stations), that individual must provide the same SUFRN to each licensee. Also, if an attributable party has an interest in a commercial broadcast station and obtains an FRN in connection with the ownership report of that station, they need to use that FRN on the ownership report of the noncommercial licensee. Noncommercial licensees thus will still need to survey their officers and board members to make sure that they don’t have other broadcast interests and to coordinate with other licensees in state systems to make sure that the same SUFRN is used.

Biennial ownership reports for all stations, commercial and noncommercial, are due on December 1 of this year, reporting on the ownership of the licensee as of October 1. While this order, if adopted on April 20, will make information collection easier for noncommercial licensees, they should still start planning their information collection process for getting information about the broadcast interests of board members in time for the December 1 deadline.

David Oxenford is MAB’s Washington Legal Counsel and provides members with answers to their legal questions with the MAB Legal Hotline.  Access information here. (Members only access).

There are no additional costs for the call; the advice is free as part of your membership.

Bill Stegath, Michigan Radio Alumnus, Passes

Bill Stegath in 2013
Bill Stegath in 2013

Michigan Radio (WUOM/WFUM/WVGR) reports that Dr. William B. Stegath, its longest living alumnus, passed away March 29, just two weeks before his 97th birthday.

Stegath was sports director for WUOM from 1953 to 1962 and is best known as the Voice of the Wolverines, announcing Michigan football games on the station, a role only held by two other people.

He also announced Michigan basketball, baseball and hockey games.   He was the recipient of eight national broadcasting awards and was inducted into the Michigan Stadium Media Hall of Fame this past September.

Stegath enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1938, earning his under undergraduate, graduate, and doctorate degrees at the University.  He also served in the U.S. Air Force from 1943 to 1946 and earned the rank of captain.

Returning to Michigan after the war, he served as professor of communications, the assistant executive director of the Alumni Association, and the first camp director at Camp Michigania.

More on Bill Stegath in the 2013 video: