Category Archives: MAPB

WGVU Holds “Great Wine and Food Symposium” Fundraiser

WGVU_031016On February 26, WGVU (Grand Rapids) held its 27th annual Wine and Food Symposium, presented by D&W Fresh Market.  Station supporters were able to sample from over 300 wine and beer selections as well as gourmet food from around the world and were able to converse with experts on the menu.

Those attending were also treated to live music by Dutcher Snedeker on the piano.

The event was held at the Grand Rapids Public Museum.  More photos here.

Radio Reader Estell to Leave Airwaves After Storied Career

Dick-Estell_200Citing recent health isues, WKAR Radio (East Lansing) reports that long-time Radio Reader Dick Estell has made the difficult and heart-breaking decision to hang up his microphone after more than half a century as the voice of the “Radio Reader.”

A passionate and avid lifelong lover of reading, Estell took over as the “Radio Reader” in 1964 for WKAR at Michigan State University. In the following years he read close to 1,000 books.

While WKAR had offered a radio reading series since 1936, it was after Estell took over the program that it was made available to public radio stations across the country. At its peak, the series had an audience of over one million.  The final “Radio Reader” episode will air on March 10, 2016.  Read more at wkar.org.

Virginia Tech Researcher Studying Flint Water Spoke at WKAR

Dr. Marc Edwards leads the Virginia Tech research team credited with revealing deadly lead contamination in the public water supply in Flint. Edwards spoke February 25 at the WKAR-TV (East Lansing) studios in the Communication Arts and Sciences building on the Michigan State University campus.

The presentation was streamed as a live webcast at wkar.org. The talk was free and open to the public.

Edwards presented his talk, “How Jonathan Baldwin Turner Saved Flint, Mich.: Public-Inspired Science and the Modern Land-Grant University.” Jonathan Turner, referenced in the title of Edwards’ talk, is credited by many as the originator of the concept of the land grant university and its mission of public service.

As an expert in the chemistry and toxicity of urban water supplies in the United States, Edwards has made significant advances in many areas, including arsenic removal, coagulation of natural organic material, and the causes and control of copper and lead corrosion in new and aging distribution systems. He is expanding his research focus to cities in crisis such as Flint, Mich.

Edwards is The Charles P. Lunsford Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia. He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2007.

The program is now available for on demand viewing in the PBS App on Roku, XBox 360, Amazon Fire, Apple TV, on iPad/iPhone, and at video.wkar.org.

The talk was sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies at Michigan State University.

Michigan Radio Covered by Columbia Journalism Review

Michigan Radio’s coverage of the Flint water crisis was the recent subject of an article at the Columbia Journalism Review (CJR).

For those efforts, Michigan Radio has won applause from listeners and industry peers. Steve Carmody is proud of what the service has done—but he also thinks about what might have been different.

“It just gnaws on me that when people were saying they can’t drink this water in May or June of 2014, I was taking, ‘Don’t worry, it’s safe’ as an answer” from state officials,” he said in recent interview. “It just sticks in my craw. I should’ve seen this earlier. That will bother me for the rest of my career.”

According to CJR, despite the fact that early pushes for more information did not happen, Michigan Radio took up the Flint water crisis as a priority once the public health concern became evident.

Read the in-depth article here.

WMHW Undergoes Format Changes

101.1 FM The BeatOn February 15, WMHW (Mount Pleasant), CMU’s School of Broadcast and Cinematic Arts’ two HD student run radio stations, underwent an exciting format change.

91.5 FM The Mountain switched from a Modern Rock to an Adult Album Alternative (AAA) format, and 101.1 The Beat converted from (AAA) to a Hip Hop format.

Mountain 91.5WMHW (Wilbur Moore Hall Wireless) started in the Fall of 1972 as a BCA co-curricular radio station. 91.5 FM began as a 10-watt college station and has grown to its current 13,000-watt level with  broadcast signal that ranges from Bay City to Cadillac and Houghton Lake to St. Johns. This extensive coverage area lends itself well to the new (AAA) format which focuses on current music and appeals more to adults than teenagers.

For more than 40 years, WMHW has been providing students professional, hands-on training, which makes them highly marketable in the radio industry after graduation. Transitioning from a modern rock format, which has virtually no presence in today’s industry and is solely a “campus” format, to a popular AAA format will certainly benefit CMU’s future radio broadcasters from both a programming and administrative standpoint.

91.5 FM will continue to provide its live seasonal coverage of CMU Women’s Basketball, Softball, Men’s Baseball, and Mount Pleasant High School Football.

Both 91.5 and 101.1 can be heard over the air and streamed worldwide at www.wmhw.org.

EMU Hires Dr. James Smith as School’s New President

Dr. James SmithEastern Michigan University (EMU) has hired Dr. James Smith as the school’s next president.

Smith has been President of Northern State University in South Dakota since 2009 and holds a doctorate in Educational Leadership from Miami University.

Dr. Smith stated, “Sometimes you do things, and they don’t work. And then you have to be bright enough to know when to exit. Eastern has a history of being a great teacher education counseling institution, and I will continue to give every ounce of my effort to make that happen.”

Smith will take office in July. Interim President Donald Loppnow will continue to lead EMU until then.

2016 Public Media Impact Awards – Criteria and Information

2016 marks the 31st year of honoring Michigan’s public broadcasting pioneers with the 2016 Public Media Impact Awards.

Purpose

·         To recognize outstanding individuals, donors, foundations and individuals involved in public broadcasting for their innovativeness, creativity, and impact on public broadcasting.

·         To inspire others involved in public broadcasting to greater achievement in the field of public radio and television.

·         To foster an exchange of innovative, creative ideas and solutions among public broadcasters.

·         To increase awareness of public broadcasting and the contributions talented individuals make to the industry statewide.

Eligibility

Professionals, volunteers, and donors involved in Michigan public radio or television are eligible for nomination. Nominations can be made by colleagues, supervisors, and/or station managers. Activities for which the person is nominated may be long-term, to recognize lifetime contributions to public broadcasting, or more recent, to reflect a concentrated period of achievement.

1.  The Public Media Impact Award for Donors is for individuals or foundations that have been able to support a specific project at a station, and the criteria states that there is not a required number of years of support.  This would be based on threshold of impact and importance in Public Broadcasting.

2.  The Public Media Impact Award for Professionals is opened up to all professionals working in public broadcasting.

Nomination Process

Deadline for nominations and supporting material is Tuesday, July 19, 2016. Please check the MAPB website for updates.

Community Gathered for Black Panther Documentary Screening and Conversation at MSU

This past Thursday February 11, WKAR (East Lansing) hosted a community conversation around the new film “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” by award-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson.

Interest in this film is very high, and all seat reservations were filled for this free event on the MSU campus.

The film tells the story of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, which sought to transform a system of racial oppression. On Sunday February 7, singer Beyoncé made news with a Super Bowl halftime performance that paid homage to the revolutionary civil rights group.

Along with a screening of the film, the evening featured discussion led by panelists Aida Cuadrado, Director of Action of Greater Lansing; Pero Dagbovie, Associate Dean and graduate school Professor in the Dept. of History at MSU; and Kelsi Horn, Vice President of Black Student Alliance at MSU.

Media were given opportunities to speak with the panelists before and after the event. Conversation throughout the evening offered insight into various views held in our community regarding the Black Panther movement of the 60s and 70s, today’s Black Lives Matter movement, and civil rights issues that affect us all.

 

Michigan Radio’s Coverage of Flint Water Emergency

By: Kristen Loszewski, Michigan Radio Marketing

Over the past few weeks, Flint’s water crisis has exploded as a huge national news story. Michigan Radio (91.7 FM Ann Arbor/Detroit, 91.1 Flint, 104.1 West Michigan) has been covering the story from the very beginning, including the April 2014 water supply switch to the Flint River, the first citizen complaints about the smell and taste of the city’s tap water, and the first reports of lead in the drinking water last July.

Michigan Radio reporters have also been explaining the story to listeners nationwide on shows like Morning Edition, All Things Considered, The Rachel Maddow Show, Here & Now, The Diane Rehm ShowOn Point, and many local public radio station shows around the country. Lindsey Smith’s documentary about the crisis, “Not Safe to Drink”, was distributed nationally by The Center for Investigative Reporting’s Reveal to public radio stations all over the country. And, last week, Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody and Tracy Samilton provided NPR’s newscasts and newsmagazines with reports on the investigation into who knew what and when they knew it.

Michigan Radio continues to report on the latest developments in this ongoing news story.

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of the above article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

Detroit Public Television Announces Partnership with the Detroit Historical Museum to Expand Coverage of Detroit’s Stories

DPTV (Detroit) has recently signed a two-year trade agreement with the Detroit Historical Museum for over 1,100 square feet of editorial office space. DPTV will be able to expand its already robust coverage of the city’s successes, struggles, and re-emergence; and The Detroit Historical Society receives a promotional package to utilize DPTV’s available broadcast and online platforms to bring additional awareness to its exhibits and programs.

“This is a mutually beneficial partnership,” said Bob Bury, Executive Director and CEO of the Detroit Historical Society. “We are excited about both the opportunity to interact with Detroit Public Television staff at the Detroit Historical Museum on a daily basis ,and enjoy the increased exposure that comes with originating local programming from our unique exhibit spaces that tell our region’s story.”

“The Detroit office will allow DPTV to expand our growing number of production initiatives in Detroit,” said Rich Homberg, President and CEO of Detroit Public Television. “We want to tell stories of the people of Detroit by assisting the Detroit Historical Society in collecting living memories of the city. The offices will serve as a vital base for both organizations as we convene conversations with leaders and citizens about the revitalization of Detroit and visualizing the city’s future.”