Category Archives: News

MAB Says Thanks and Good Luck to Jennifer Preslar

Jennifer Preslar

Longtime MAB Vice President of Programs Jennifer Preslar is leaving the MAB after 15 years of stellar service for a little “Green and White.”  Yup, we are losing another great staff member to Michigan State University.

Preslar said in her letter to the MAB Board that she has enjoyed her time at MAB and will greatly miss her members and MAB Staff but the offer was too good to pass up.

A passionate Spartan, Preslar will be working as an event coordinator in MSU’s  College of Communication Arts & Sciences as well as WKAR-AM/FM/TV.

The MAB education event services will be handled by Jacquelen Timm, MABF Manager/ Development Director in the interim while President/CEO  Karole L. White works with the Executive Committee to see what talents are needed on the MAB staff as it begins to undertake the new “MAB Future” strategic plan.

GLBC News Sessions Preview

Les Rose
Les Rose

We’re happy to welcome Les Rose, Professor of Practice, Broadcast and Digital Journalism, Syracuse University S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communication to speak at this year’s GLBC.  Rose will present four great sessions at this year’s conference.

Rose’s professional bio includes over 31 years as Staff Photojournalist at CBS News; Visiting Seminar Leader at the University of Florida for 7 years; Visiting Staff Seminar Leader at The Poynter Institute for 17 years; and 12 years as News Photographer for KCBS-TV.

“Luggage Carts and Broken Hearts: True Tales and Tips of TV News”
Wednesday, March 8, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Stations expect multi media journalists, Les will give you valuable tips including:

    • Journalists that happen to use a camera Instead of a laptop
    • Freeway Devil: Preparing the story on the way TO the story. Structuring the story on the way there, and then adapting it to what is actually there.
    • How to turn a PR Handout to a Standout.
    • The ultimate baseball fan and a lesson in moments. Broken second mic was a good thing. Transitions and a Stairway to Heaven.
    • Multiple jump cuts are not a mistake, it’s a technique.
    • Take the “Man on the Street” OFF the street, and make it infinitely more powerful.
    • To get a great interview, leave the gear in the car…if only for two minutes. Really, two minutes.
    • Putting the subject(s) at ease: leave your shoes at the door, and accept the water. I’ll explain!
    • A hard news lead story shot in a day, with feature character building.
    • Everyday stories that have disabled people as sources, yet the stories aren’t about disabled people!
    • WHAT to DO and NOT do in a fire: car engine running and parked for departure.
    • How to shoot a policeman’s funeral when they won’t let you in.

“Sound Advice”
Wednesday, March 8, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Les will share some tips for using sound to enhance your reporting. Lessons learned will include:

  • Listen Up: Improving a reporter’s read.
  • Photogs are the hockey goalies…last person to make the save before it goes out.
  • Using windscreens INSIDE.
  • Two people, one mic: no problem.
  • Have a sip: how a tea (Throat Coat) can save a shoot.
  • Interviewing Children…get on their level physically and below their level mentally.

“Let There be Light, but Make it Fast, Could You???”
Wednesday, March 8, 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Les will cover his top tips to get the best lighting for your story, including:

  • Lighting by Loews…LED lighting saves time and temperature.
  • Night live shot lighting: expose for the background light. The reporter only needs a little light for a much better look.
  • Very fast noon time lighting: without a light. A silk and a reflector=great daytime lighting, in about 4 minutes.
  • The perfect chair to shoot an interview subject and it is NOT the one they love.
  • The office sequence, outside the office…for the win.
  • The Skin they are in: Mattify is a must, glossy is a bust.
  • While we are at it: the office sequence you gotta do daily and got to do better.

“What a Funeral Director can Teach us about Quick and Easy Production Techniques”
Wednesday, March 8, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Production tips include:

  • Pullouts and dissolves in time.
  • Don’t move the camera, move the object.
  • A leather book makes a heck of a creek.
  • Weeping willows and the value of the casual interview.
  • Visual Cues will make for better stories and better writing: In commercials and in your storytelling.
  • A TV commercial has to tell a story in a minute or half that…and can tell the story without saying a word.
  • Cat and the Cook commercial.
  • Budweiser Airport.
  • Action/reaction. Talked about a lot, but seldom practiced.
  • Budweiser Puppy Commercial.
  • The importance of background in your interviews.
  • Revisiting the compressed look interview, at a higher speed.
  • Pulling a Farkas (the further away the camera is, the more intimate the interview. Takes NO time!)

In addition to sessions presented by Les Rose, here’s another session that may be of interest to news personnel:

“From Concept to Completion: Creating Content with your iPhone”
Presented by Steve Julin & Tim Peterson, Specs Howard School of Media Arts
Wednesday, March 8, 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

ATTN: Radio and Press! This is your intro to video for your websites!

Photographer Jay Maisel is credited with saying “The best camera is the one you have with you.” Well, chances are you almost always have your phone with you so you almost always have a camera in your pocket. But today’s phones aren’t just any old camera. They can shoot high definition video, 4K video, stop motion and even slow motion. They’re so versatile that creating videos or short films is in right in the palm of your hands. In this session, seasoned filmmaker Steve Julin will walk attendees through all aspects of creating content with an iPhone. Topics include, settings, apps, support gear, developing an idea, basic interview techniques, field audio, post production and uploading a finished video. Start shooting great videos with the camera you have on you.

Not registered yet for GLBC? Online registration is closed, but on-site registration will be available Tuesday and Wednesday, March 7-8. www.GLBConference.com

Free MAB Web Training on Wage/Overtime Laws

When Taking Care of Business Requires Working Overtime

Responding to the Department of Labor’s New
Overtime Pay Obligations: A Guide for Broadcasters

Wednesday, June 22, 2016
2:00 – 3:15pm ET
ONLINE only

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor published final regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) that more than doubled the minimum salary level necessary to be exempt from the Act’s overtime rules.

While the changes affect all businesses subject to the FLSA, broadcasters in particular may feel the impact of the changes given the staffing models used by many TV and radio stations.

The new requirements will go into effect on December 1, 2016, and broadcasters need to take steps to adapt to, and minimize the impact of, those changes prior to that deadline.

Communications and Employment practice attorneys from the Washington D.C. law firm Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman will be online to discuss what the new requirements will mean for broadcasters come December, and how these changes affect the existing exemption for certain employees at small market stations.

Speakers:

Scott R. Flick, Partner, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman
Rebecca Carr Rizzo, Counsel, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman
Moderator, Oscar Rodriguez, President, NASBA & Texas Association of Broadcasters

Register here by June 21 to receive login details.

News & Journalism Sessions Preview – GLBC

GLBC’s sessions for journalists and those in the news media are top-notch this year!

Tuesday, May 3, 2016
8:30 – 9:30am

Valerie Geller Presents: Get, Keep, and BUILD Your Audience!

Valerie Geller
Valerie Geller

Content is king and those who create your content are what set you apart from every other “screen” or speaker you compete with. Everyone can improve and move to the next level of performance to create powerful content for news & personality TV & Radio, and work more effectively across ALL platforms!

The key to staying the most relevant content source for your audience is all about becoming a more powerful communicator and storyteller. There are no boring stories, only boring storytellers. In this session, learn proven techniques to grow not only your talent, but your audience as well.

These proven “Powerful Communicator” methods, in use by top broadcasters throughout the world, are based on just three things: “Tell the Truth, Make it Matter, and NEVER be BORING.” Aircheck coaching, finding and developing talent and powerful storytelling techniques, on-air performance coaching techniques are all included. Each participant will come away with actionable techniques to become stronger, more compelling broadcasters, armed with techniques they can put into practice immediately to engage and grow their audiences.

10:00 – 11:00am
Becoming a Powerful Storyteller
Presented by Valerie Geller

Whether you’re writing news, producing, an on-air personality, or writing copy for promotion, sales or public service it all starts with good writing and powerful storytelling – in this session you’ll learn proven techniques in use by top broadcasters throughout the world.

10:00 – 11:00am
Turn the Story Fast: How to Find Focus, Gather Quickly, Make Deadline
Presented by Al Tompkins, Poynter Institute

Al Tompkins
Al Tompkins

The key to great deadline storytelling is finding laser sharp focus. Let Al Tompkins show you how. He will show you show you how to:

  • decide what goes where in your story;
  • find the soundbites that make your story memorable;
  • make any story more interesting by attaching your story to one of eight motivators; and
  • change the shape of the story to turn multiple versions of the piece for different shows.

11:30am – 12:30pm
Jaw-Droppingly Cool Online Tools and Apps
Presented by Al Tompkins, Poynter Institute

This will be the most fun session of the day.  It is one you CANNOT miss and it is the one you will be telling your newsroom about. You will use what you learn on your next shift. Take a romp through a constantly updated lineup of awesome tools that journalists are using every day to stream live video from their phones, build interactive maps and data tables, 360 interactive photos and voice to text technology that will save you tons of time transcribing. This session is just plain fun.

Everything you learn you will be able use in two minutes or less, with no coding skills for free. Bring your iphone and tablets and play along as we go!

Register on-site for GLBC if you haven’t registered in advance!

2:30 – 3:30pm
Ethics on Deadline: How to Make Tough Calls when Time is Tight
Presented by Al Tompkins, Poynter Institute

We will deconstruct real cases that newsrooms faced on deadline. Cases that involved airing controversial images, bumped up against issues of race and editing. You won’t leave with hard rules to follow, you will get something more meaningful, a way of thinking through the tough calls you face every day. Come ready to participate in this lively and practical session.

2:30 – 3:30pm
When Local Tragedy Strikes Overnight
Panelists include: Duane Alverson, MacDonald Broadcasting; Peter Tanz, Midwest Communications; Steve Koles, WWMT/CW7-TV

iStock_000023801866_SmallMany radio and some television stations cut back staff overnight, going down to a skeleton staff. Or, with new technology, may even lock the doors and go home with no one at the station. Others may have the minimum wage operator on duty. How do you handle a major local threat that is not weather related? Are you prepared? Do you have an emergency news coverage plan? How will you serve your listeners and viewers under great stress and with diminished experienced staff capability. Our panel will use the recent tragic shooting in Kalamazoo as an example of how to handle breaking news on a Saturday night. The panel will offer “best practices” on how to handle a multi-location event when staffing is generally the lowest of the week.

4:00 – 5:00pm
How to Cover Breaking News Responsibly and Aggressively
Presented by Al Tompkins, Poynter Institute

As a follow up to the previous session on local tragedies, Al Tompkins will address, from a news gathering perspective, the best ways to handle:

  1. Covering Hostage Situations
  2. Covering Severe Weather
  3. Chemical Leaks, Fires and Explosions
  4. Truck, Train and Bus crashes
  5. School Shootings
  6. Surprise death of a prominent person

Register on-site for GLBC if you haven’t registered in advance!