Category Archives: Programming

The Lost Art of Air Checking

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

If you are a regular reader of my newsletters and MAB columns, there’s one thing you know for sure, I believe in being “Brilliant with the Basics.” One of the most basic (and important) jobs a PD can do is critique talent. But with today’s busy PD schedules, this often gets ignored. So now that you’ve been reminded, set up an aircheck session today. To
help, here’s a rundown of important areas to review:

MORNING SHOWS

  1. Trying too hard to be funny. There is a difference between “fun” and “funny.” Being fun is important and much easier to do.
  2. Not enough time checks. Too much time in-between time checks.
  3. Not enough benefit driven re-cycle mentions to “listen at work.” Use the morning show to get them into listening during the most important daypart, at work.
  4. Being an “Island” from the rest of the station. Not promoting what will happen later in the day on the station.
  5. Laughing at everything said. Laughing when it is not funny.  Nervous laughter (especially with sidekicks).
  6. Bits that go too long. In focus groups, most listeners “zone out” after about 20 seconds (unless it is really good).
  7. If you’re still doing news. Stories that have no interest whatsoever to the target listener. Use of words like “officials” and “authorities.”
  8. No promotion of what is coming up next. No appointment setting.
  9. Weather teases that give away the forecast.
  10. Talk for talk sake. Music is still a very important reason that people listen in the morning.
  11. Failing to sound warm and friendly.
  12. Weak or old fashioned benchmarks. Drop the weakest one.
  13. Too much reliance on pop culture, show business, entertainment “blocks.” Most AC listeners rate this very low in importance.
  14. Companionship. Are you good companions for your listeners?

OTHER DAYPARTS

  1. Jocks who sound stiff/formal and un-natural.
  2. Not promoting the stations unique benefits enough.
  3. “SAYING” liners versus “SELLING” them.
  4. Not promoting tomorrow’s morning show.
  5. Sounding bored and un-interested.
  6. Failing to realize that you are their workday companion.
  7. Use of DJ Crutches such as:
    • Good Afternoon
    • Good Evening
    • With You
    • Thanks for listening “Everybody”
    • On a (day of week)
    • “Everybody”
    • Hump Day (if your jocks use this PLEASE eliminate)
    • Saying goodbye at the end of the shift

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

The Robinson Report: Let’s Eat An Egg

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

“It’s crazy what you can talk yourself out of when you’re scared and into when you’re not.” -Missy Welch

Innovation is a lonely place.

Usually an ‘ah-a’ moment experienced alone.

Experimentation carries risks – most aren’t prepared for negative results.

Discovery is easy – as results are handed to you.

These are funny – and messy things.

Recently – when developing a new hybrid format with a trusted partner, we asked:

“This is so obvious – why aren’t more people doing this?”

Simple.

There was no research – or previous lab reports when the first person said:

“Let’s Eat an Egg”

This comical observation came from my broadcast partner who also said:

“Somebody had to be the first person to say – Let’s JUMP out of an airplane”!

As we developed this new hybrid, memory popped of the Roadmaster format our group developed in 2006.

At that time, there were no ‘egg eater’ or ‘plane jumpers’ – for that hybrid.

Today – they are prolific.

Innovations are quickly followed by doubters.

Chirping away – ‘If it doesn’t work, then what’.

Or – ‘Where has this ever worked’.

Innovation is essential to growth

Insight, experience – and upcoming patience – will be the order of the day.

Take sixty seconds – click here – and hear what Legend Neil Young says about chance.

Anyone else hungry – for eggs?

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin was a featured speaker at the 2017 Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference (GLBC) in Lansing.  He lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.

Fall Book Prep: 10 Areas to Review for a Strong Ratings Performance

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

(The Fall book starts September 14th)

Hard to believe, but in diary markets, the fall book starts in one month. Since I am a big believer in “being brilliant with the basics” here are 10 programming musts if you want a good outcome when the books are released.

1. Keep the music familiar and focused. Take no chances on unfamiliar music. Check the log carefully daily for balance and flow. Avoid clumping of any same sounds. Keep the tempo “even.”

2. Sell the music position and the benefits of listening to the station. Music is the #1 reason people listen to the radio. Sell your music quantity and quality benefits. Specific music quantity benefits work much better than generic. Example: “Continuous Half Hours” and “7-In-A-Row” is better than “Long Sets.”

3. Own AT WORK. Promote the benefits of listening at work. Especially in AM Drive.

4. Morning fun! Keep the morning show bright, up and most important, loaded with interesting, fun, compelling material. Remember, there is a difference between “fun” and “funny.” If your morning show is music based, make sure to keep the music as the star.

5. Branding. Make sure to attach your calls to all services and features. Make sure it’s not “traffic” versus “WXXX Traffic.” Sell your positioning statement & key benefits. Always when going back to music from spots. Always on the end of Weather when going back to music.

6. Use as much “Appointment” promotion as possible. Keep em coming back for more. Make sure each morning show promo has a specific reason and time for tune-in. Same applies to the morning show. Pre-promote ahead to take the most advantage of content breaks.

7. Keep listener testimonials fresh & real. Listener testimonials can be very strong weapons to credibly promote the key station benefits. Make sure all testimonials talk about a specific thing such as morning show, most music, Best Music etc. Avoid “stroke” testimonials such as “we love you.” Live testimonials versus those done on the phone sound and work better.

8. Watch the talk. Keep the personality but also keep a lid on extra, non-essential talk. It is amazing how much unnecessary talk happens on radio stations.

9. Sell “More Music Weekends.” Many stations have a much more music intense sound on the weekend. Take advantage of this and promote as a benefit. “Weekends always mean more music” or “It’s a more music weekend.”

10. Production elements. Make sure all liners and sweepers clearly promote the strategy. If it’s more music, focus on it and sell it hard. Work in some jingle cuts you have not used in a while. Look at prior packages that have not been used recently. If re-writing liners/sweepers be careful not to lose the basic point; listening benefits.

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

The Robinson Report – It’s Not JUST Radio

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

“Social Media is not about the exploitation of technology but service to the community” – Simon Mainwaring

As with – Radio.

Perhaps it was the long hallway of empty studios – with whirling servers in solid control.

Or Sports Illustrated’s Rick Reilly’s decades-old tirade about the high theater of American’s pastimes in his It’s Not Just Sports tirade.

Regardless, more than halfway through 2017 and less than 150 sleeps until Christmas – a reminder that It’s Not JUST Radio.

It DOES heavy the heart see Group Heads applaud voice-tracking dozens of markets – into unmanned radio stations.

Or walls of market-specific voice-tracking pits.

We can still connect listeners – with true emotion.

Even with pre-recorded tracks. Just put effort into it.

Going beyond the automated control rooms, vacated transmitter sites (nearly every action dictated by programmed computers), there remains high radio theatre all over America.

For those with actual live talent in their studios, you have the ability to connect with a story – now.

There is an unselfish child who is showing unreal courage, in face of terrible medical odds, resting at St. Jude’s.

Will you connect your listeners with a family in dire need this upcoming holiday season (Yes – someone will be playing Christmas music in 90 days.)?

Perhaps you know the story behind Boston’s debut album. Still amazed.

The feeling of witnessing listeners of non-commercial radio, rising to meet a critical need sends chills down the spine.

At my first radio post, a coverage map hung on the studio wall.

Glaring at it, I would imagine the potential connection with Listeners in the southern half of The Hoosier State.

And I still imagine.

Because It’s Not Just Radio.

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin was a featured speaker at the 2017 Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference (GLBC) in Lansing.  He lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.

Are your ‘Personalities’ difference makers for your station?

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

Some new tips for programming and management:

There’s a lot of noise out there in radio-land these days. Digital. Internet advertising. Podcasting, Apps, Alexa and many others. Now don’t get me wrong, I think that’s all important. Very important. But, we may need to slow down for a second and look at an area that is a key reason listeners listen and that is the on air personality. Whether you have talk show hosts or DJs on a music station, listeners enjoy and more importantly want their local radio stations to have personalities.

The other day I was scanning through Rick Sklar’s “Rocking America.” It’s the story of what is arguably one of radio’s most successful radio stations ever, WABC in New York. In his book, Rick details what made WABC so successful. He devotes a full chapter to the on-air personalities and how important they were the the station’s success.

I would like to share just a few of his quotes from “Rocking America.” After you read them, ask yourself: How is my station with our on air people? Would my listeners think of our personalities like New York listeners thought of WABC’s? Could this be the missing link for greater success on my radio station?

From “Rocking America …”

  • The impact of WABC cannot be summed up in a corporation’s profit and loss statement. To the listener, radio is a personal medium.
  • During the dozen years of its heyday, WABC, its music and its air personalities became an intimate part of the lives of tens of millions of people who lived in the Northeast.
  • Mornings without Herb Oscar Anderson or Harry Harrison, afternoons without Ron Lundy or Big Dan Ingram, evenings without cousin Brucie were unthinkable to WABC listeners.
  • Those voices, each so unusually amiable and delivered with the warmer than life resonance of the WABC sound, were friend, family and counselor all in one.
  • The songs they played were so popular that they became the national hit music for America. Their appeal crossed every demographic barrier.

Think about it. Can you say these things about your on air personalities? I believe that on music driven stations we sometimes focus too much on content and not nearly enough on how our jocks sound and come across to the listener.

Let’s discuss this. I’d love to know what you think. Call me (248) 737-3727 or email gary@garyberk.com .

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

The Robinson Report: No Small Parts

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

If you’re in the small club to see the TOP of the Statue of Liberty, you’ll find immaculate detail that rivals all other parts of Lady Liberty.

So, why is this a – thing?

In September 1875, there were no flying machines.

Yet French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi put as much time and detail into a place that he knew would never be viewed by the public – as all other small parts of his budding figure.

Audio products are the same.

The often cast-aside “small parts” are the things that take a brand from good – to great!

How a brand is “processed” – makes a difference.

Although many don’t even consider it a “part.”

Every piece of imaging – every song – each break has individual nuances.

How they blend together is an art – often lost on those who have only created sound by machine.

Jingle packages used to have cuts that had clear transitions between differing tempos and keys.

Not simply “spots” – as many are produced today.

That’s why, when commenting on the details of “scoring” an audio brand at a recent conference, the words hit me below the belt.

“I don’t think the listener notices, you know, things like that,” she said.

Whoa.

True story –after installing a new automation system at a station, it began to crash with regularity.

The engineers discovered the talent was “moving” too many parts between elements.

To create a superior sound – scored to perfection.

After hearing that story, a well-respected group head noted “That’s why you’re #1”.

When mastering sonics the greats know there are no small parts.

You hear it – your thought bubble, when you do, is something like:

“I wouldn’t have done it that way…”

Listen to your small parts. How are they playing together?

Don’t hear the difference in the small parts – the atmospherics?

I know a guy.

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin was a featured speaker at the 2017 Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference (GLBC) in Lansing.  He lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.

Station Information Packets, Old School Marketing Techniques That Still Work and Show Your PD Some Love!

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

Some new tips for programming and management:

Fill out your Nielsen SIP (Station Information Packet). They may say you don’t have to, but I say do it. Make sure your SIP is correct. You never know when an editor may need clarification. Why take a chance that your information is out of date? You need every quarter hour you can get!

Do you have a “relationship” with your P1’s? This the #1 and most important way to achieve strong ratings. You can play all the right songs; have all the right sweepers and the best jingles in the market, however, if you’re missing that hard-to-describe link that bonds the listener to your station, the ratings will most likely not be there. Remember the old saying “People Listen to People They Like.” Is your station likable? P1’s always fuel their favorite radio station with lots of 1/4 hours.

Listener databases still work.  A little “old school” can go a long way. Take advantage of technology that is sitting on your desk today and is free. A listener database is a great way to speak to listeners and thank them with special offers that mean something to them. Many stations are wasting this by dumping worthless promotions into these databases. “Here’s what’s happening at WAAA” does not mean anything. It sends out a message that communication from my favorite station is really spam.

Better: Send out an e-mail blast on Wednesday that says when you will play a secret song on Thursday. Give a “special number” to call to win $100. Make sure they understand that this contest is only for them. For $100 a week (less than some spend on lunch) you could set yourself up for a ratings spike.

“Change” is not AC’s friend.  About to make an adjustment? Think about them carefully. When changes in programming are made on a whim it could ultimately hurt or even worse, open up an opportunity for a competitor. By the way, listeners are more aware of on-air changes than we think, so yes, they do hear that “extra spot.”

The earlier the better with marketing. If you are marketing for the book, starting early in the book is preferred. Many believe that it takes 60-90 days for changes to affect a rating book. By starting early, you allow the cumulative effect of your marketing to affect the book.

GM’s & Owners: Programmers need love too! Have a weekly meeting or lunch out of the station to catch up and allow your PD quality time for important matters. Tell a jock you heard a good break. Send a note after a jock does a nice job at a remote. Walk by the studio and give thumbs up.

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

Gary can be reached at (248) 737-3727 or gary@garyberk.com.

The Robinson Report: The Road and The Race

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

“Winning has nothing to do with racing. Most days don’t have races anyway. Winning is about struggle and effort and optimism, and never, ever, ever giving up.” ― Amby Burfoot, Runner’s Guide to the Meaning of Life

In Appleton, Wisconsin a long haul driver loads his Peterbilt with summer sweet corn for a cross-country run. Needs to arrive before the harvest turns.

In Iowa, Iowa Corn 300 winner Helio Castroneves and his crew sweat through a red-flag rain delay, waiting for the track to dry. Adjustments to the conditions are needed.

Boise, Idaho. A family piles into their mini-van, headed south on I-84 for a weekend in Ogden, Utah. They stop by the Wapi Lava Fields – just because.

It’s been 10 years since middle-aged men convened at the 2007 NAB Radio Show proclaiming radio will be ‘re-branded’ by the year 2020.

That year in Austin, NAB figureheads read the press, drank the Kool-Aid and were convinced the radio image was broken.

Many of those same NAB’ers will return to Austin this September with reflection that they were far from the mark.

Radio trends – are strong.

Broadcast media – especially radio – has survived the road and the race, regardless of the speed bumps.

Television, 45 records, cassettes, CD’s, Mtv, satellite radio, Napster, iPhone.

All reported as radio – killers.

Every one of our roads (stations) is unique.

And the race (strategic battle) is market specific.

There IS no cookie cutter.

Radio re-invention is occurring at many levels – with great success.

When guys in suits tell you that a race worked in Reno – or Raleigh, tell them that your road is different.

It’s – market unique.

Totally exclusive.

Enjoy the ride.

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin was a featured speaker at the 2017 Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference (GLBC) in Lansing.  He lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.

Remotes: Make ‘Em Great

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

From radio’s earliest days, remotes have been a part of our landscape. Today, they still cause much talk at radio stations. Should we do remotes or not is the most commonly asked question (especially among programmers).

At many stations, remotes are necessary, especially this time of year (summer).  So, with that in mind, here are a few tips to make them work for the client as well as your station.

MAKE SURE YOU SOUND GREAT!

Avoid having talent remotes or call in’s on the telephone. Listeners are used to hearing them over the air with finely tuned audio chains. Years ago, getting a good remote phone line was complicated and costly. Not the case today. If you do remotes, invest in one of the many systems that easily produce digital quality over any type of phone.

If you are going to have a PA at the remote, avoid feedback. While PD at WJR in Detroit, we did many remotes and always seemed to have a PA problem. Our Chief Engineer, Ed Buterbaugh, came up with a great solution. Instead of having one or two large PA speakers (that usually cause feedback) he bought 10 smaller, high quality speakers. He would surround the remote site with these. Each had a separate volume control so we could adjust each individually. Since there were many speakers, they did not have to run at high levels. We never had feedback on remotes again.

SOUND GREAT: LOOK GREAT

The fact that listeners cannot see us is a great part of the radio mystique. When we go out on remote that goes away. It is for this reason that we must look great with equipment and sets as well as talent. If you use a van, make sure it is spotless and always polished. It should not have body damage and the inside should be neat and clean.

Leave the “card table” home. Get an impressive looking “set” to bring on remotes.

All station personnel should be “dressed for success.” Some type of “station wear” should always be worn. Unless you are at a pool/beach/summer outdoor promotion, T-shirts are a no-no. The station should invest in contemporary outfits. Remember that first impressions are lasting ones!

PREPARATION EQUALS SUCCESS

1. Have a plan. Know who is responsible for what. Review and go over the day before. Load the van the day before. Make sure the van is neat and clean inside out.

2. Make sure the account executive is at the remote. Since this is their account, they must plan to be there for the entire event to make sure that client relations are handled in the correct way.

3. Get to the remote site at least two hours ahead of the event. Have plenty of banners and giveaways at the site. Balloons are great. They are inexpensive and kids love them. Do not forget the helium tank. Having some type of gimmick can also be most effective. Some stations have a mascot that hands out pictures. Some have the Money Machine. The more you have to offer the more attractive you are to not only the client, but to perspective listeners.

4. Test the connection to the studio. Make sure you have a good line, and the board op can hear you and you can hear them. In this day and age of advanced technology there is no excuse for the first breaks to be sloppy and all over the place.

5. If you are going live, make sure there is good communication from the remote to the studio. The talent at the remote site must have working headphones to hear.

6. Have a plan/script for all drops/call-in’s. Keep remote drops to :60. Write it down so you do not end up repeating yourself repeatedly. Pre-plan each drop with the client so they will know exactly what they will be getting.

7. Do an email blast before the remote. If you have a database, send out e-mails to the database letting them know that you are coming to their neighborhood. Invite them to come and meet you. Won’t you look great to the client when you load the place up with people!

Finally: Record the drops

When you are doing one or two drops an hour, many stations find that recording the drops is more effective than doing them live. This way if an error is made, it can be re-done. Over the years, I did many a remote this way and listeners never realized the talent was recorded. This also allowed talent more time at the remote site to meet, entertain and talk to listeners.

Hopefully these tips will help you turn your next remote into a win-win for everyone!

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

Gary can be reached at (248) 737-3727 or gary@garyberk.com.

The Robinson Report: Brand – or – Bland

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

“There’s a trend in marketing today to make brands ‘fully integrated’ and ‘seamless.’ In other words, to eliminate all incongruity and surprise. Shallow blands are fully integrated and seamless. To be deep and attractive, a brand must have incongruent characteristics that make it interesting.  Just like a person.” – Roy H. Williams

You feel it in the minute you step into a place – any place.

Vibe.

That – feeling.

Target is different than Wal-Mart – and WAY different than K-Mart.

The file from previous visits burnt into your brain nearly pre-determines your experience.

The gate experience at Disney is far different than – say – Six Flags.

You get that instant gut feeling about how YOUR experience is going to turn out.

Word-Smith genius Roy Williams wrote about it 10 years ago – in THIS article.

YOUR brand is no different to your customer.

It’s more than aural consumption.

You can be a robust brand while pre-recorded (Ask for examples)!

During Customer Face Time, how does your customer consume their experience?

In your brick and mortar lobby – are there self-serving plaques (resembling a mortgage company) on the wall?

Or – items reflecting the entertainment of your brand?

How is your customer greeted?

When was the last time a staffer took 10 minutes to spontaneously offer a quick tour of your facility?

Vibe also extends to street presence.

When a customer approaches you on-site, how do you present?

Some – even today – cocoon on-site, insulating them from the customer.

In a measured every vote counts.

Imagine if Donald Trump wanted the Presidency – but didn’t meet any voters.

Enhancing every experience for your customer insures the BRAND won’t be – Bland.

 

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin was a featured speaker at the 2017 Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference (GLBC) in Lansing.  He lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.