Category Archives: Programming

Listeners Speak… Are We Listening?

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

As a radio professional, I’m sure you have often wondered what your listeners are really thinking about your station. Based on countless research studies and in-market focus groups, here are some of the most common points that come up with female AC listeners.

Title & Artist is a major benefit to the female listener. In focus group after group, when you bring up back-selling of music, all agree that it is very important and their favorite station does not always do it. We think they know all the songs. They disagree. In many cases, the listeners brought this up as a negative. They wonder why their favorite station does not tell them the songs played. Having this info on your website is a step in the right direction, but not what they really want, which is to hear it on the air. As always, this especially applies to newer and recurrent songs.

“Good chemistry” is #1 in AM Drive. When asked why they liked their favorite morning show a lot, the word “chemistry” came up time after time. The relationship of the players and the way they get along on the air is critical. Other important issues in the morning are “fun” shows (not to be confused with funny) as well as shows that they are “used to and comfortable with.”

Music is still important in the morning. As usual, listeners want it all. They want a show loaded with fun people having a good time, but they also want a lot of music. Please do not overlook the power and importance of music in the morning.

Local is more important than ever. It is amazing how aware people are of radio ownership. In some markets, they can name the commonly owned stations as well as where they are located. They are also more aware than ever of the use of voice tracking technology. In one market, they talked about the “former owners” who sold to a “conglomerate.” Stressing that you are live and local is a positive. Talking about local landmarks and knowing the area can have a positive effect. People see radio as a local, hometown media. One woman said how she liked it when the traffic reporter explained where the accident was by using business locations as reference points (“On the corner of Maple and Orchard Lake across from McDonald’s”).

Morning and night personalities are the best known. In most groups, listeners were very unsure of the midday and afternoon personalities. For stations that have their own love songs host, there is usually good familiarity.

With music: “More tempo and more contemporary” is what they want. Many ACs are finding out that they need more tempo and need to be more contemporary with their music. Please remember, more contemporary is not about playing more current, unfamiliar music. Think familiarity and recurrent here.

AC radio is a “safe haven” for women 35-54. Clean lyrics and G-rated content is still important to these women. No need to call the station “family friendly.” They say they know which stations follow this practice.

P1 Women like to play contests. The prize is not always as important as “the chance to win.” If they feel they have a chance to win, it is good. Prizes such as theater tickets, weekend getaways, dinners at restaurants and tickets to concerts are all good. “Entertaining contests” seem more important to many of these listeners versus the actual prize itself.

Stopping fewer times for spots is preferred. Most listeners like the two-stop clocks, but are aware that they will “pay for it” (their words) in the end. They do however feel it is better to stop less often even if it means more spots. The one common comment heard in market after market is they feel “all stations play too many commercials.”

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

The Programming Meeting: 6 Ideas to Make your Station Sound Better!

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

Here are 6 ideas that, if implemented will not only make you sound better but you’ll probably raise your numbers too! Your consultant will be checking back to make sure they’re all done by the end of the week (lol)!

BE LOCAL. Build in positions on the clock to mention people, places and events. Take advantage of traffic reports to sound local. Former KVIL, Dallas morning man/PD Ron Chapman did it best; “The accident is at Main and Second, right in front of McDonalds.” Dallas listeners could always picture exactly where the accident was. Being local is important, but being good is key. Always strive for the best product that reflects local tastes.

BE HUMAN. Remind your talent that they are like actors. Actors use scripts. Their “interpretation” brings the words to life. The same applies to station benefits. If jocks just read them they will not work. Adding the human touch and not losing the message brings them to life. But, be careful not to allow jocks too much room to “interpret” the liners. Many times, in their attempt to do this, the focus and point gets lost.

WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME? PROMOTE YOUR BENEFITS. Every time a jock opens the mic they should promote a benefit of the station. It is hard enough to get listeners to hear our message. Frequency is key here. Music quantity and at work use are essential.

THE LOST ART OF AIR-CHECKING. It is so important that talent understand what you expect. It also strengthens your relationship with them. Doing an aircheck session will alert you to things you may not normally hear. This goes for live, in-building jocks as well as voice-trackers. Do one today and hear the difference tomorrow.

STAY CLOSE WITH PROMOTIONS. Seems like every advertiser wants a promotion to go with their schedule. That’s why the program director should be the final link in all promotions. Make sure they are right for the station, and executed properly to help improve ratings. Example: How does this promotion increase occurrences of listening or cume? Are we talking about it enough/too much? More and more we learn: Promotions are the icing on the cake. Music is still the #1 reason people listen.

ARE YOU OVERUSING YOUR VOICE PERSON? If your voice talent is on the air more than your jocks, you may want to review that. Use your jocks to sound live, local and vibrant. Trust me. Your listeners like your DJ’s.

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

Traffic and Weather Together: Quick tips to Make it Sound Great!

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

Doing traffic and weather may seem simple, but its easy for both of these services to become “wallpaper” or just be done the wrong way. Since most radio stations do both of these daily elements, check out these tips and instantly see how great they sound on your station. Your listeners will appreciate it too!

TRAFFIC

GIVE ME THE TRAFFIC REPORT, PLEASE. Nothing annoys listeners more than hearing the traffic intro and then the jock goes off on a tangent, talking about everything but the traffic. When the intro hits, get directly to the report. Save the “schmooze” for other places.

WHAT DID THEY SAY? Have your traffic reporters developed their own language? Make sure they speak with easy to understand words. At the news station here in Detroit, they always refer to I-75 as “The Chrysler.” Problem is, nobody calls it that. People call it 75. Traffic reporters are the only ones who use that name.

SLOW DOWN. Many traffic reporters speak so fast to include everything that you end up hearing nothing.

THEN WHY DID THEY DO THE REPORT? Avoid “Nothing is going on.” If that is the case, why are we doing a report? Avoid this traffic reporter crutch: “Things are winding down.” What does that mean?

BETTER TSL. Avoid using traffic reports as a tease unless you are going to site a specific problem. “There’s a problem on 95 South by Salty’s billboard at exit 56. We’ll tell you why next on 92 PRO-FM.”

RATINGS HINT: Get credit by attaching your call letters to traffic reports. Avoid “We’ll check traffic next.” Better: “We’ll check Lite 101.9 Traffic next”

WEATHER

ONE PUNCH JINGLES SOUND BETTER. Two-punch weather jingles never sound as good as one-punch versions. Have a longer emergency bed only for use on bad weather days when necessary.

ELIMINATE PARTLY TO MOSTLY CLOUDY WITH HI’S IN THE MID TO UPPER 60’S. Use fewer words. Eliminate use of words such as Hi’s, Low’s. Do the weather format the same, all the time. This is a great one from Don Kelley when he was PD at Magic 106.7 in Boston.

Sunny & Warm Today, 78

Clear Tonight, 66

C’MON, I NEED TO KNOW HOW TO DRESS. Like with traffic, once the jingle hits, get to the weather. This is not schmooze time. Now that we’re into Fall, how about “What to Wear Weather.” or “School Day Weather.”

RATINGS HINT WITH WEATHER: When doing weather back to music, make sure your format includes a strong station benefits.

“Sunny and 89 with another 30 minutes of Today’s Best Music starting now.”

TV PEOPLE ARE GOOD FOR YOU. Have a relationship with a TV station and its meteorologist in AM Drive. Use their name on weather reports throughout the day. Make sure they do not get too technical and involved. Keep it fun, simple and concise (TV weather people are notorious for going too long).

Once you get these on your station, let me know how it’s working for you.

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

The Robinson Report – Legend

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

“I won’t be a rock star – I will be a legend.” – Freddie Mercury

Tom Petty – Dead.

The news swept the music industry and shocked the world.

Not a Bucket List concert for me – but I still have a bright red disc of “Change of Heart.

Legend is fleeting – and mortal.

You can learn much by associating with legend, if you identify them.

Like Bill Drake.

Bill Drake was a large figure – in stature and legacy.

Click HERE if the name stumps you.

Bill was considered one of the fathers of music radio as we know it. His talent stable was legend – Boss Jocks on Boss Radio.

Bill held school on music nuisances with names like Diddy Bop, Chin Boogie and his detest of “story songs.” From his “corner office” in a San Fernando Valley strip mall, the tall Texan, who paid cash for everything while living in a motel, passed somewhat quietly nearly nine years ago.

I’m a better programmer because of those 3 p.m. “sessions” in The Valley.

Also, I’m reminded of a few legends I’ve had the honor to call – colleagues.

Dick Biondi, John Records Landecker, Clark Weber, Bob Hale, George Johns, Glenn Beck, Bob Dearborn, Guy Phillips among many others.

I am the broadcaster I am today in large part because of these associations.

Which leads me to this.

There are living legends – today – from which YOU can learn.

These top-of-gamers are insightful, engaging and accessible.

Fred Jacobs – who invented many things, among them Classic Rock – shares ideas weekly (if not MORE often).

Tracy Johnson – offers webinars on talent development – FREE!

Lori Lewis – radio’s digital Gold-Standard – shares what she’s learned – and applicable in all businesses.

Dick Taylor – now spreading his genius in academia – writes a transparent and brutally honest blog – which you can read – FOR FREE!

Roy Williams – “The Wizard of Ads” – will add YOU to his Monday Morning Memo – FREE!

Seth Godin – has been blogging before it was a thing as his stuff transfers not only to media but all creative (and business) – also FREE!

Connect then learn from the talent above and who you consider genius while they are still  accessible.

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top Three of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink and he has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin was a featured speaker at the 2017 Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference (GLBC) in Lansing.  He lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.

The Power of Testimonials

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

Nothing is stronger than a testimonial from a listener. We can say anything we want about the station, but in the end, when it comes from a real sounding listener, it always has more credibility. There are a few tricks to gathering, producing and making these sound good. Use these powerful ideas and ramp it up today!

Live testimonials sound more effective than those recorded on the phone. They are warmer, and have a more credible sound.

Always have a digital recorder at station events/remotes. Assign one person to do nothing but gather testimonials. Preferably one who is not shy and has an outgoing personality. Make sure you use a good mic and recorder. An old fashioned cassette machine can handle this well if you do not have a digital recorder.

Stay away from “stroke” testimonials. By “strokes,” I refer to listeners saying generic statements such as:

  • We love you.
  • You’re the best.
  • Anything that has listeners “screaming.”

Go for authenticity. Whether they are locally done or from a production package, they must sound authentic and describe the experience the listener gets when listening to your station.

When gathering, ask specific questions (see below). Once the question is asked, make sure to:

  • Allow the listener to finish the thought. Do not interrupt.
  • Keep the mic close to them.

Good questions to ask:

  • What do you think of the music played on WXXX?
  • Where do you listen to WXXX?
  • What’s your favorite part of WXXX?
  • What do you like most about the WXXX morning show?

These types of questions will get you answers that will playback as good benefits.

The key here is get comments where listeners describe the “positive experience” they get from listening to your station.

Good places to run testimonials:

  • On the top hour ID. String a few together for a powerful top hour presence.
  • On jingle sweeps. Use a jingle bed with listeners over it, and tag with sung calls.
  • In a promo starting with a line something like: “There are many great reasons to listen to WXXX, but nobody says it better than our listeners!”

Listener testimonials are powerful. Keep them real and they will work for you today.

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

Are You Truly LIVE & LOCAL?

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

By now, everybody knows the pain and devastation that was caused by Hurricane Irma. Since the beginning, coverage of storms like this have been radio’s strength. Radio people love emergency coverage and, if I must say so myself, nobody does it better. Listeners depend on local radio, yet are we prepared to handle these situations? You’d be amazed at how many radio stations do not have a plan to execute emergency coverage.

The purpose of this is not to discuss staffing cutbacks in radio. It’s to give you guidelines of how to deal with the next weather (or any other type of) emergency that can hit at any time. With that in mind, here are the steps I recommend you take as soon as possible:

  • Get a generator at the studio and transmitter site. Obvious yes, but you’d be surprised how many stations do not have working generators. If you have generators, great. Just make sure they are tested on a regular basis. Yes, they are expensive, but in an emergency, it’s the most important tool you will have. Without power, well, you’re done.
  • If nothing else, do this today. Establish a working relationship with a local TV station. The fact is, local TV stations (with news staffs) have more people and are better prepared to handle emergency coverage. The arrangement needs to allow you to simulcast their audio at any time. Promote your new alliance. Let your listeners know that when an emergency occurs you’ve teamed up with (TV station name) to keep you updated.
  • If you are truly committed to “live and local” have your own personalities handle emergency coverage. No matter what your format, I’ll bet that your on-air people would do a great job with bad weather coverage. Plus, you can enlist other staff members to help. You’ll be amazed how they will do. Use all the staff power you have, no matter what their position. Interns, receptionist and sales assistants might surprise you.
  • Drop your format and let them go. Emergencies are not about most music. It’s about information.
  • Even though you will depend on TV for the bulk of the coverage, you still need one of your personalities on your air. If for no other reason to jump in every 10-15 minutes and let listeners know what they are listening to and to update from your end.
  • Set audio feeds up so all you need to do is hit a button on the board and their audio is on your air. This needs to be done today. You never know when you will need it. On September 11, many stations found themselves putting a microphone in front of a TV speaker to carry audio.
  • Have an emergency “play-book” simply written and in the control room. It should outline all procedures when initiating emergency coverage. Local emergency phone numbers should also be here.
  • Have imaging done and ready to go. What will you call your coverage? Have verbiage written. Have a plan for commercials. In many emergencies, you will need to suspend them.
  • Keep emergency food & water stocked up. Food delivery might not be available. Water and nonperishable food (that can be stored) is best.
  •  Last, but not least! Consider building showering facilities. If your people are stuck there for a few days, this will be a lifesaver!

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

Does Your Music Play As It Is Scheduled? 

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

Just this week, while talking with a PD we discovered that the log he was preparing was not actually playing as scheduled. Reason: The hard drive or jock was dropping music to meet time restrictions. The station ended up dropping important songs which caused both era and tempo problems. The hours he spent editing the log, all went down the drain. Is this happening to you? If so, check what is being scheduled vs what is actually playing.

Jocks and hard drives should not be making critical music decisions. Good fix: Schedule the amount of music you actually use. Make sure fill music (at the end of the hour) is always secondary. Also, make sure you reconcile music on a daily basis.

Log Editing

If set up properly, most music programs do a good job of rotating music. Minimal editing should be required. However, there are a few important areas to look for:

  • Use Artist Group Separation. This keeps Adam Levine away from Maroon 5. Check all artists that are in both a group as well as solo. Example: Eagles/Don Henley, Fleetwood Mac/Stevie Nicks, Michael Jackson/Jackson 5, etc.
  • Keep an “Even Wave of Tempo.” Spread out your most up-tempo songs.
  • Separate sounds. Make sure all songs have the proper sound codes. Country, rock, urban, wimpy, MOR etc. Keep the sounds apart to avoid clumping.
  • Do not swap categories. Most stations have era-based systems. When you switch a category, there is a good chance you will introduce era clumping. Better, swap songs within the category within the hour first.
  • It’s all in the details. Would a cold open song sound better going from jingle to music? Are you running a :12 second sweeper intro and :03 intro song?

Too many unscheduled positions? Try this…

For those of you who get more unscheduled positions than you prefer, try scheduling the same day a few times over. Schedule the day. Then do it again, and even again. Each time you will see the number of unscheduled positions go down. This procedure only takes a few seconds and can make daily editing easier.

15-20 unscheduled positions a day is normal. If you think that is too high, think about this. Would you rather break a rule 20 times a day or 200 times a day? Unscheduled positions also force you to carefully look at the log on an hour to hour basis.

Worry about burn IN not burn OUT

Many programmers are worried that liners and sweepers burn out. I say forget burn out and worry about “burn in.” It takes a long time to burn our messages into listener’s heads. We get tired of them, but the listeners are just starting to get the message.

Messages take time to burn in, don’t give up or change too soon

This especially applies to TV spots. TV needs frequency to build in people’s minds. I just spent a night at focus groups where the listeners loved the station TV spot. They knew it, liked it and thought it was perfect for that station. Are the station folks somewhat tired of the spot? Maybe. Are the listeners? Not at all! Should they change? You tell me.

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

The Robinson Report – The True Threat

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

In February, you may have read THIS article on “The True Threat.”

No longer is it simply morning TV – or any other screen.

Nor is “The True Threat” far from The Connected Dashboard, Podcasting or Second Screening.

Nope.

“The True Threat” is: Us.

Marketing blogger Seth Godin refers to this as Optimize vs. Maximize.

Although it goes against the current, Social Media is a focus grinder.

All of THAT – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snap Chat (shiny new toys) – has taken focus off The Mother Ship.

If it weren’t for The Mother Ship, none of THAT would matter.

Optimizing – or Maximizing.

Optimizing time – for The Mother Ship.

Hyper-targeted content – time discipline – effective appointment scheduling.

When a brand stumbles, it’s usuallya  lack of focus.

Log your time this week – if you are focusing MORE on non-Mother Ship issues – you will lose.

THIS – points out parallels of other brands’ self-inflicted wounds:

Traditional media has rendered The Mother Ship – rudderless.

“Technology – is NOT the REAL disruptor.”

Focusing on the icing (digital) and not the cake (brand) for your customer.

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin was a featured speaker at the 2017 Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference (GLBC) in Lansing.  He lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.

The Lost Art of Air Checking

Gary Berkowitz

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Gary Berkowitz
Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting

If you are a regular reader of my newsletters and MAB columns, there’s one thing you know for sure, I believe in being “Brilliant with the Basics.” One of the most basic (and important) jobs a PD can do is critique talent. But with today’s busy PD schedules, this often gets ignored. So now that you’ve been reminded, set up an aircheck session today. To
help, here’s a rundown of important areas to review:

MORNING SHOWS

  1. Trying too hard to be funny. There is a difference between “fun” and “funny.” Being fun is important and much easier to do.
  2. Not enough time checks. Too much time in-between time checks.
  3. Not enough benefit driven re-cycle mentions to “listen at work.” Use the morning show to get them into listening during the most important daypart, at work.
  4. Being an “Island” from the rest of the station. Not promoting what will happen later in the day on the station.
  5. Laughing at everything said. Laughing when it is not funny.  Nervous laughter (especially with sidekicks).
  6. Bits that go too long. In focus groups, most listeners “zone out” after about 20 seconds (unless it is really good).
  7. If you’re still doing news. Stories that have no interest whatsoever to the target listener. Use of words like “officials” and “authorities.”
  8. No promotion of what is coming up next. No appointment setting.
  9. Weather teases that give away the forecast.
  10. Talk for talk sake. Music is still a very important reason that people listen in the morning.
  11. Failing to sound warm and friendly.
  12. Weak or old fashioned benchmarks. Drop the weakest one.
  13. Too much reliance on pop culture, show business, entertainment “blocks.” Most AC listeners rate this very low in importance.
  14. Companionship. Are you good companions for your listeners?

OTHER DAYPARTS

  1. Jocks who sound stiff/formal and un-natural.
  2. Not promoting the stations unique benefits enough.
  3. “SAYING” liners versus “SELLING” them.
  4. Not promoting tomorrow’s morning show.
  5. Sounding bored and un-interested.
  6. Failing to realize that you are their workday companion.
  7. Use of DJ Crutches such as:
    • Good Afternoon
    • Good Evening
    • With You
    • Thanks for listening “Everybody”
    • On a (day of week)
    • “Everybody”
    • Hump Day (if your jocks use this PLEASE eliminate)
    • Saying goodbye at the end of the shift

Gary Berkowitz is President of Detroit based Berkowitz Broadcast Consulting, specializing in ratings improvement for AC radio stations. www.garyberk.com

The Robinson Report: Let’s Eat An Egg

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media

“It’s crazy what you can talk yourself out of when you’re scared and into when you’re not.” -Missy Welch

Innovation is a lonely place.

Usually an ‘ah-a’ moment experienced alone.

Experimentation carries risks – most aren’t prepared for negative results.

Discovery is easy – as results are handed to you.

These are funny – and messy things.

Recently – when developing a new hybrid format with a trusted partner, we asked:

“This is so obvious – why aren’t more people doing this?”

Simple.

There was no research – or previous lab reports when the first person said:

“Let’s Eat an Egg”

This comical observation came from my broadcast partner who also said:

“Somebody had to be the first person to say – Let’s JUMP out of an airplane”!

As we developed this new hybrid, memory popped of the Roadmaster format our group developed in 2006.

At that time, there were no ‘egg eater’ or ‘plane jumpers’ – for that hybrid.

Today – they are prolific.

Innovations are quickly followed by doubters.

Chirping away – ‘If it doesn’t work, then what’.

Or – ‘Where has this ever worked’.

Innovation is essential to growth

Insight, experience – and upcoming patience – will be the order of the day.

Take sixty seconds – click here – and hear what Legend Neil Young says about chance.

Anyone else hungry – for eggs?

Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin was a featured speaker at the 2017 Great Lakes Broadcasting Conference (GLBC) in Lansing.  He lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.