Tag Archives: Issue 137

Announcing the Congressman John D. Dingell Jr. Journalism Scholarship

John D. Dingell, Jr.

Commercial and Public broadcasters owe so much to Congressman John D. Dingell, Jr., former Chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the longest serving member of Congress.

Congressman Dingell was very involved with the MAB and was as knowledgeable on broadcasting and telecommunications issues as anyone working in the business.  Congressman Dingell cared very deeply about the first amendment and valued the Fourth Estate. We are all so saddened at his passing.

Dingell with former FCC Commissioner James Quello

He was a key supporter of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 that allowed for creation of PBS and NPR. He fought to ensure broadcasters were treated fairly in the first DTV transition in 2009 and during the FCC’s TV spectrum incentive auction

The MAB office has been flooded with phone calls asking what members can do to honor his memory. Marla Drutz, a close personal friend of the Dingell Family and a member of the MAB Foundation Board of Directors suggested starting a John D. Dingell Jr. Journalism Scholarship within the MAB Foundation. This Scholarship will serve as a perpetual reminder of the Great Statesman and friend.

You and your company may honor Congressman John Dingell with a contribution to the John D. Dingell Scholarship Fund. Make your checks out to the MAB Foundation noting that your contribution is for the John Dingell Scholarship fund.

Send your contributions to MAB Foundation 820 N. Capitol Ave. Lansing MI 48906. Our goal is $50,000.00.  You may also give securely online by major credit card.  CLICK HERE

Our thoughts go out to the entire Dingell Family at their time of mourning.

Congressman John Dingell: 1926-2019

MAB Says Goodbye to a Dear Friend: Congressman John Dingell Passes at Age 92.

“It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of John David Dingell, Jr., former Michigan Congressman and longest-serving member of the United States Congress,” the office of his wife, Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, said in a statement. “Congressman Dingell died peacefully today at his home in Dearborn, surrounded by his wife Deborah. He was a lion of the United States Congress and a loving son, father, husband, grandfather, and friend. He will be remembered for his decades of public service to the people of Southeast Michigan, his razor sharp wit, and a lifetime of dedication to improving the lives of all who walk this earth.”

The Congressman passed away the evening of February 7.

Dingell served in the House of Representatives for 59 years and 22 days, from 1955 to 2015. According to the House historian’s office, he served with 11 presidents and cast 28,551 votes. Of that time, he served on the Energy and Commerce Committee for nearly 58 years, making Dingell the longest serving member on any congressional committee. He served as chairman of the committee for more than 15 years.

“Congressman John Dingell was a one of a kind statesman. He served this nation well and was true to his convictions. He was a good friend to broadcasters and deeply believed in the first amendment and the value of the 4th Estate. We would meet with him often and he was always straight with us,” said MAB President Karole White. “He loved to discuss policy. He had a knowledge of telecommunication issues that was remarkable. Whether or not we agreed, we came away from our meetings with a more in depth perspective of all sides of an issues. Our most sincere condolences to Congresswoman Debbie Dingell and the family. We are all sad today.”

In 2014, Congressman Dingle was honored by the Michigan Association of Public Broadcasters (MAPB) during ceremonies at The Grand Hotel, Mackinaw Island for his contributions to public broadcasting.  Below is a tribute video played during ceremonies.

5 Rules for Twitter from The Atlantic’s David Frum

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

In this week’s column, Seth provides insights from a political strategist who knows a thing or two about the best – and worst – uses of Twitter for messaging and communication. 


David Frum, well-known author and political pundit, former George W. Bush speechwriter and Senior Editor of The Atlantic was a guest of Preet Bharara on a recent episode of the podcast Stay Tuned with Preet (starting at 18:45). In it, Frum talks about his use of Twitter, saying “Twitter is a dangerous tool; it is an opportunity to end your career in a second.”

Most of us have participated in a heated discussion on social media before, and we’ve certainly seen colleagues in the industry find themselves in trouble because of the way they used social media. So when Frum offers up his ground rules for using Twitter responsibly, I thought I’d share them here:

1. “No arguments about arguments.”

David Frum

While Frum doesn’t shy away from disagreeing with people on Twitter, he’s careful to stay on topic. He warns against getting drawn into side arguments: “You’ll say something and somebody will say, ‘Well, you didn’t say a different thing about a different topic.’” Discussions can easily spiral out of control if you allow the conversation to chase tangents. Be conscious of this and stay focused.

2. “Always keep your cool.”
Frum doesn’t let friends drink and tweet. Also, he says, “Never do it when you’re in a situation of emotional distress of any kind.” If you find yourself playing on tilt, it’s best to check yourself before you wreck yourself.

3. “Follow institutions…and then follow people who really know what they’re talking about.”
There’s an ancient Silicon Valley proverb: “Garbage in, garbage out.” If you are following people on Twitter who routinely post uninformed or misinformed tweets, you are likely to do the same. Don’t confuse fame with expertise. Make sure that the people you are following are knowledgeable. Also, recognize that nobody is knowledgeable about every single topic, so pay attention to which topics the people you are following are knowledgeable about.

4. “Never try and get the last word.”
Frum says he thinks of his conversations on Twitter like his conversations as a guest on television shows: You’re talking to the people who watch. “You’re not talking to the host, you’re not really talking to the other guests; you’re talking to the people on the other side of the camera.”

The same is true with the Twitter. Because the conversation is public, be aware of the people who are reading the conversation but not participating in it. You may have a strong urge to land one last witty blow against somebody you disagree with, but onlookers may not view this in a flattering light.

5. “Just as our parents didn’t understand that TV wasn’t real, we often have a hard time understanding that social media isn’t real.”
When television first emerged, audiences didn’t yet understand how it could be manipulated. Video footage influences how people interpret an event. A classic example is the televised presidential debate between John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon in 1960. While the consensus of those who watched the debate on television was that Kennedy won, most people who listened to it on the radio thought that it was a draw or that Nixon came out on top. We understand today that there’s much more to television than just the finished product we see on the screen. For example, we know that reality TV shows are often scripted and heavily edited to manipulate the emotions of viewers.

While we are often on guard against this type of manipulation on television because we grew up with the medium, we may be more vulnerable to it on social media because we haven’t been using it as long. “We’re victims of made-for-social-media moments that are very manipulative,” says Frum.

He points to the recent example of a confrontation between a high school student and a Native American protester at a march in Washington, D.C. In the days following the incident, more and more information emerged that the initial video didn’t capture, adding additional context. In recent years, we’ve seen more and more examples of this. What social media posts can capture is, at best, incomplete, fragmentary, and at worst, intentionally manipulated.

Social media can be a powerful tool, but with great power comes great responsibility. Even Frum admits that he doesn’t always adhere to these rules. Bharara asked him, “Have you ever tweeted in anger?”

Frum replied, “I have a few times, and I’ve always regretted it.”

Hopefully, Frum’s rules can help you use Twitter wisely.

And stay out of trouble in the Tweetsphere.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at [email protected] or 1-800-968-7622.

WYCD Receives Three ACM Nominations

Entercom’s WYCD-FM (Detroit) has received three nominations from the Academy of Country Music for radio awards presented during the “54th Annual ACM Awards.”  The awards are set for Sunday, April 7 in Las Vegas.

WYCD is up for Major Market Station of the Year as well as two nominations in the Major Market Personality of the Year category.  Morning drive hosts “Chuck, Rachael & Grunwald” as well as afternoon drive hosts Rob Stone and Holly Hutton were nominated.

Detroit’s WDZH Adds Kim Adams to Airstaff

Kim Adams

WDZH-FM (Detroit) has named Kim Adams as new midday host effective immediately.  Adams has over 20 years of on-air TV experience as a meteorologist for WDIV-TV and WXYZ-TV (Detroit) as well as WBNS-TV (Columbus, Ohio).

“Kim Adams is an award-winning television personality and one of metro Detroit’s most recognizable faces,” Entercom/Detroit SVP/Market Manager Debbie Kenyon said.  “We’re excited to welcome Kim to our team and know she’ll help our listeners breeze through their day.”

“I’m grateful for this opportunity to host the midday show on 987 The Breeze and excited to transition from television to radio,” said Adams. “Radio enables live dialogue between hosts and listeners and I’m looking forward to connecting with the Motor City every weekday.”

Free Jacobs Media Webinar: What Happened at CES 2019?

Jacobs Media Strategies and INSIDERADIO are offering a free webinar for all broadcasters on Thursday, February 14 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern.

Every year the company travels to Las Vegas for CES, the world’s largest consumer electronics trade show, to see what new technological trends will impact the radio industry.

The free webinar will share the new trends on display at CES 2019, including:

  • Autonomous vehicles
  • Voice command devices
  • Smart cities
  • Robots and AI
  • 5G
  • and more

Register here.

FCC Sets Up Re-Scan Help Desk for Consumers Dealing With TV Repacking

This past Monday (2/4), the FCC announced that it is setting up a consumer help desk, where operators will be standing by to answer questions about rescanning the TV spectrum to find TV stations that have changed channels due to the repacking of the TV band. Many TV stations will be changing channels due to the repacking of the TV band following the broadcast incentive auction which shrunk the number of channels dedicated to TV broadcasting as part of the TV band was repurposed for wireless communications uses.  As the TV stations that were forced to change channels by the repacking make those changes, consumers receiving their TV signals over the air will need to “rescan” the TV band to make sure that their sets find all the local stations on their new channels.

Viewers may reach the call center toll-free by dialing 1-888-CALLFCC (1-888-225-5322) and pressing “6” to speak to a help desk representative. The call center is staffed from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. Eastern time, seven days a week, to enable consumers throughout the country to obtain assistance during evening and weekend hours.

WJR’s Ann Thomas Inducted to Michigan Business Hall of Fame

Ann Thomas

This past Monday (2/4), WJR-AM (Detroit) Executive Producer Ann Thomas was inducted into the 2019 Michigan Business Women Hall of Fame class.  The induction took place at the 23rd annual Women Thrive Conference at Detroit’s MGM Grand Casino.

Thomas is the executive producer of the Paul W. Smith Show heard weekday mornings on WJR.  She is also the executive producer of the radio station overseeing the work of all producers at WJR. Thomas began her career at WJR in 1982 as an intern after graduating from Michigan State University and has since remained a part of the WJR team. She started her broadcasting career in the WJR news department as a street reporter and an anchorwoman.

During her 37 years at WJR, Thomas has received numerous awards from the Michigan Association of Broadcasters, United Press International, Associated Press and the Detroit Press Club for her work on and off the air.  She is the 2014 recipient of the Michigan Business and Professional Association’s Women and Leadership in the Workplace Award. She has also been given the prestigious “Diamond” award from the Women in Communications Organization.

Thomas is also the host of two shows, Women Who Lead and WJR’s Healthy Woman Show. She created and developed WJR’s successful Women Who Lead award program honoring women in the Great Lakes area. During football season, Thomas can be be found in East Lansing producing WJR’s Tailgate Shows.

WKAR’S Curious Crew Begins Season 5!

Photo credit: Amanda Pinckney / WKAR-MSU

WKAR Public Media (East Lansing) has announced that the 5th season of Curious Crew debuted this past Monday, February 4.  The Emmy Award-winning science show, produced by the station, is seen on public television stations nationwide.

Dr. Rob Stephenson and his crew of inquisitive kids continue to take a hands-on approach to scientific exploration. Join them as they investigate electromagnetism, bioplastics, soccer science and more!

The new season includes 10 new episodes, each featuring a Curious About Career with Curious Crew cast member Janellyn and Genesis. In these segments, fans can look forward to learning about careers with female professionals working in a wide variety of STEM-related fields.

Each Curious Crew episode in the series also includes a set of Curiosity Guides, a step-by-step guide that kids, parents and educators can use to do their own investigations at home or school.

WLEN Hosts 25th Annual Radio Auction for Kiwanis Club

This Saturday (2/9), Lenawee Broadcasting’s WLEN-FM (Adrian) will host The Kiwanis Club of Adrian’s Annual Radio Auction from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The 25th annual auction features hundreds of items up for bid, broadcast live over the radio. Community members are encouraged to tune in to the station and call to bid on new items each half hour. The Kiwanis Club Items up for auction will be listed prior to the event on the Kiwanis Club of Adrian website and Facebook page.

Proceeds of the auction fund Kiwanis projects such as the expansion and beautification of the Kiwanis Trail, bicycles given to area children who read during March Reading Month, providing grants to local non-profits and providing Christmas gifts to area children in need.

The Kiwanis Club of Adrian is a local service club that intentionally takes action to revitalize Adrian.