Tag Archives: Issue 30

Save the Date: BCBC 2016

bcbc16-web-header
We’re busy planning the MABF’s largest student conference of the year, the Broadcasting Career Builder Conference!

DATE & LOCATION
Friday, November 18
Eagle Eye Golf Club & Conference Center, Bath MI
8:00am-4:00pm

This conference attracts hundreds of students eager to learn about the field of broadcasting. For many students this conference is the key factor in their decision to pursue broadcasting beyond high school. We need YOU to help educate them on this exciting and fast paced industry!

The MABF is looking for professional volunteers to participate as mentors in the BCBC Speed Networking sessions. As a mentor, you’ll meet with students face to face and share your experiences and “insider tips.”

If you’re interested in getting involved, please contact Alisha Clack at the MABF, clack@michmab.com or 517-484-7444.

MABF Fall 2016 Career Fairs

16-fall-career-fair-cc-header
It’s time for the MAB Foundation’s Fall Career and Networking Fairs and we want YOU to be a part of the action!

DATES & LOCATIONS

Tuesday, October 11
Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant
12:00pm-3:00pm

Thursday, October 20
Specs Howard School of Media Arts, Farmington Hills NEW LOCATION!
4:00pm-7:00pm

Thursday, October 27
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
12:00pm-4:00pm

In an effort to connect employers and schools with potential employees, students and interns; and to assist stations with the current EEO requirements, the MAB Foundation will once again be holding regional Broadcast Media Career & Networking Fairs throughout the month of October.

These events attract hundreds of students and young professionals eager to meet with you and continue their career journey in the broadcast and media industries.

Please join us! Click here for complete event details.

Reserve your booth here: ONLINE REGISTRATION.

Each booth is $275 and includes a co-sponsorship of the event and a boxed meal for vendor representatives (2 maximum).

Consider attending all 3 Career Fairs to gather a diverse group of resumes. Students from each region in the state will offer your company different views, ideas and opinions and may be beneficial to your station! By attending all 3 fairs, you’ll be able to prove that your station is seeking out a diverse group of new staff and interns throughout the state.

Questions?  Call Rachel or Alisha at the MAB: 1-800-968-7622.

MAB Foundation Elects 2016-2017 Board of Directors and Officers

jenniferwilliams-web
2016-2017 MAB Foundation Chair, Jennifer Williams, Greater Media Detroit.

The Michigan Association of Broadcasters Foundation (MABF) elected their 2016-2017 Board of Directors and Officers during the Michigan Association of Broadcasters’ Annual Meeting on August 30 at the Inn at St. John’s.

The newly elected officers include:

  • Chair – Jennifer Williams, Greater Media, Inc.
  • Vice Chair/Chair-Elect – Paul Jacobs, Jacobs Media/jacAPPS
  • Secretary/Treasurer – Pam Manor, WNEM-TV (Saginaw)
  • Immediate Past Chair – Sue Goldsen, Jackson Radio Works

Directors elected to serve a second term include:

  • Wendy Hart, Spartan Sports Network
  • Paul Jacobs, Jacobs Media/jacAPPS
  • Jam Sardar, WLNS-TV (Lansing)
  • Stephen Schram, Michigan Public Media

Board members elected to serve a first term include:

  • Mary Helen Ciaravino, Washtenaw Community College
  • Marla Drutz, WDIV-TV (Detroit)
  • Eric Hammerstrom, Marquette Senior High School
  • Jim Lutton, WWMT-TV (Kalamazoo)
  • Jon Whiting, Michigan State University

The MABF congratulates the newly elected officials and looks forward to working with them in the year ahead. For more information about the MABF and its board members, please visit michmab.com/MABF or contact the MABF office at mabf@michmab.com.

Rethinking the Radio Station Promotions Kit for the Digital Age

Seth Resler
Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

Many radio stations’ street teams have a standard kit that they take to promotional appearances which includes everything they might need on site. When I was a Program Director, we packed gray rubber tubs with everything from clipboards and entry forms to banners and prize wheels.

The purpose of these Promo Kits was simple: To provide the street team with ways to entertain listeners at events. But now that we’re in the digital age, the goals of our promotional appearances have changed, and our Promo Kits should evolve to reflect these new goals.

Here are the new goals of our street team appearances:

1. Create Compelling Content
In addition to entertaining people on-site, we now have the ability to use promotional appearances to create content that entertains people online. We can do this in a number of ways, but two of the most effective are by sharing photos or live-streaming video of the event. For this content to get a reaction online, it’s going to need to be visually compelling. We need toys and games that look good on camera.

When we reevaluate the promo kit through this lens, it becomes apparent that some of our old standbys are no longer up to the task (“Goodbye, prize wheel!”), while others still make the cut (“Great job, banner roll!”).

Moreover, we may need to add some new weapons to our arsenal. While the tiny thumb-wrestling ring may no longer meet our needs, large sumo wrestling suits, Chinese dragon costumes and oversized gongs may fit the bill. Additionally, you may need support equipment to create visual content, such as camera tripods or selfie sticks. At your next Promotions Department meeting, brainstorm a list of things you’ll need to produce compelling visual content at every on-site appearance.

2. Collecting Contact Info
On-site appearances are also a great place to collect contact info — either phone numbers or email addresses — from your listeners. Don’t use pen and paper to collect email address; somebody on your team will be stuck with the thankless job of entering all of that data into the computer, which is time-consuming and prone to errors. Collecting business cards has the same problem.

Instead, get a tablet with an iPad and install an app on it which allows people to type in their email addresses. The app should upload these email addresses directly to your database. Many email service providers offer an app for collecting data this way. You’ll also want a stand that allows you to lock the iPad to your table so nobody walks off with it. Some models cover the buttons on the tablet, preventing people from exiting the email collection app.

Text messages can be a great way to collect contact info because listeners usually have their phones on them. You can set up a service that allows them to sign up for your email newsletter by text message. When they send a keyword to a specific number (such as “WKRP” to 55555), they will receive a reply asking for their email address. When people respond to the opt-in message, they will be added to the database.

To enact a text messaging opt-in program like this, you’ll want to include a short explanatory phrase (e.g., “Get our email newsletter! Text WKRP to 55555.”) on your table skirt, your banners, your hand stamps, the back of your bumper stickers, etc. The more you promote it, the more you’ll grow your database.

Text messaging has presented issues for some broadcasting companies because trolls wait for broadcasters to run afoul of the law and then pounce. Always check with your legal team before adopting any course of action involving text messaging.

The Promo Kit has been a staple at radio stations for years, but it may be time to overhaul yours. For more digital strategies that you can incorporate into your radio station’s events, check out our recent webinar on the topic.  Watch the webinar here.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

Shrink The Audience

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

KevinRobBy: Kevin Robinson
Robinson Media 

“At stadium shows, we connect by shrinking the audience, reducing the place so the guy in the back row of the balcony is the one left.”  –Dave Murray, Iron Maiden

No, this isn’t about losing audience. Rather, this is about GROWING audience by connecting with an audience of ONE.

The key to building a relationship with the audience – any audience – is communicating to ONE person and NOT thousands.

You remember your favorite radio or TV personality growing up – he or she was talking to YOU – not everyone else.

Whether it was Cousin Brucie, John Records Landecker, The Real Don Steele or (insert your favorite here), they were doing their show for YOU – and no one else.

Broadcast Talent (unlike stage actors) must break the ‘4th wall’ and connect directly with the target. They have the unique opportunity to be one with the audience.

Talent grabs audience – just by showing up. Get them to LOVE you by bonding in a one-on-one relationship.

As they say, you get audience ‘one at a time.’

Accomplish this by telling stories – reducing trite ‘bits.’

Eliminate words that build the wall (‘everybody,’ ‘out there;’ ‘where you are’) and simply employ the word ‘you’ with intimate regularity.

Deliver content as though the audience is sitting in the room with you!

Eradicate nonsensical language such as ‘radio’ and ‘station.’

Your show should be an experience – not a box or building.

Doing so will increase your Audience Eye Contact, galvanize the relationship with the audience and GROW your brand by connecting with the audience of ONE!


Kevin Robinson is a record-setting and award-winning programmer. His brands consistently perform in the Top 3 of the target – often times as the list leader. In his 35 years of radio, he’s successfully programmed or consulted nearly every English language radio brand. Known largely as a trusted talent coach, he’s the only personality mentor who’s coached three different morning shows on three different stations in the same major market to the #1 position. His efforts have been recognized by Radio & Records, NAB’s Marconi, Radio Ink, and has coached CMA, ACM and Marconi winning talent. Kevin lives in St. Louis with his wife of 30 years, Monica. Reach Kevin at (314) 882-2148 or robinsonradio@aol.com.

Uncover Your Customer’s Needs

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By:  Brian Marriott, P1 Learning

Sales opportunities don’t just spring up out of thin air. You have to uncover them. If you aren’t prepared to ask the right questions, they could be precious opportunities lost.

Finding the problem will lead you to the best solution for your client. Here are four important reminders when uncovering leads.

1. Build trust and rapport
Nobody likes to be interrogated with questions; it can make them uncomfortable – or even worse- defensive. Start the meeting casually, as if you were meeting with friends, but don’t be overly familiar or waste their time. People like doing business with people they know, like and trust. Let the prospect know the purpose of your questions – they should see that you’re trying to genuinely understand their business and determine if there’s a solution that your company can offer.

2. Ask the right questions at the right time
Have a list of questions prepared before the meeting, but don’t be a slave to your script. Their answers to your questions will likely bring up follow-up questions. By being prepared in advance, you can shift the conversation in the direction that will uncover their true need. Remember to always ask open-ended questions (who, what, when, where, why, how). Questions that can be answered with a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’ won’t necessarily get you the information you need – you don’t want to limit their ability to answer in any way. Take notes, it’s a sign that you’re truly interested and engaged.

3. Dig deeper
Once you’ve uncovered areas of opportunity, continue to ask questions, repeating some of the words that they’ve used to show that you are listening and understand what they are really saying. Delve into the opportunity and continue to ask open-ended questions. In fact, remember to Always Ask Why (AAW). If your customer is opening up about their biggest challenges, don’t be afraid to follow up with something like, “why is that?”, “why has this not been fixed already?”, or “why is this a priority now?”. The more they talk, the more you’ll learn.

4. Summarize and set the stage
Once you’ve uncovered the opportunity, state it to your prospect clearly – again, trying to use as many of their words as possible. Confirm that you ‘got it right’ and then suggest how you could help solve this problem. Most often than not it’s okay if you don’t have an immediate solution. Tell your prospect that you need a day or two to reflect, but get back with them in a timely fashion. Then, once you both agree that your solution may be a fit, set a clear expectation of what happens next.

It’s one thing to assume you have their needs, it’s another to know you do. Time is precious, and your chances of getting the right deal from a qualified buyer requires the right questions from the get-go. Go deeper into discovering your client’s needs by logging into P1 Learning today and watching the course, Conducting the Needs Assessment.

P1 Training is a member benefit on MAB.  Don’t miss out on your opportunity for free, online training.  Sign your staff up today!

What I Learned About Being a General Manager

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

dicktaylorBy:  Dick Taylor,  CRMC/CDMC
Dick Taylor Blog
https://dicktaylorblog.com/

I loved being a general manager of radio stations. It wasn’t the job that first attracted me to radio however; it was to become a disc jockey. From as far back as I can remember I wanted to be a DJ on the radio. My first radio microphone was made out of tinker toys. Then I got a Caravelle (pictured below) transmitter for Christmas from Santa Claus and I took to the air waves.

radio_240I started in commercial radio when I was in the 10th grade in high school, getting my FCC 3rd Class Radio-Telephone Operator Permit. Due to my age at that time, I needed to get a work permit. The Massachusetts employment office that issued those types of permits for underage workers asked me what type of employment I would be doing. I told them, I’m going to be a DJ. They didn’t have a category for DJ in their book, so they wrote “Talent” on my work permit and sent me on my way. I never mentioned that I would also be taking transmitter readings every half hour standing next to a 1,000-watt broadcast transmitter. If I had, they would never have issued me a work permit, as that environment would have been considered to hazardous for a person who was only 16 years old.

As I look back on it, it almost seems ironic that I could have a license to operate a commercial radio station, but my mother would have to drive me to work and pick me up because I couldn’t get a driver’s license to operate an automobile.

In time, I would learn that what I really wanted to do in radio was not be the person who was the product, but the person who ran the whole enchilada; also known as the general manager. To get to that lofty office, I would need to leave the air and programming and go into sales.

Once in sales I quickly rose through the ranks to sales manager, station manager and finally general manager. Yes, at the ripe old age of 32, I was a general manager in Atlantic City, New Jersey; the world’s famous playground.

Lessons Learned

So what did I learn almost three decades later? A career is not a sprint, but a marathon. You never know everything you need to know. Every day is a learning experience. That your attitude becomes the attitude of your employees, so keep it positive.

Success

Like making a baby, you can’t speed up the process of success in life. It takes time. Repetition is key. Malcolm Gladwell in his book Outliers wrote it takes about 10,000 hours of repetition and practice to master anything.

While Radio Ink Magazine named me one of the best general managers in radio before I left the industry to become a broadcast professor at a university, I would find that I would learn even more about my craft trying to teach it to others. So today, I think I’d be a much better general manager than when I took a sabbatical to enter teaching.

Love

They say if you love what you do, you will never work a day in your life. That was true for me about my radio career for over four decades and it’s been just as true for my teaching these past six years. But here’s the big take away: You can love your career, but it will never love you back. So you have to make time for the things that do love you back like your family. I may have been a hard working, successful radio general manager, but I never missed any of the special moments in my boys’ lives as they were growing up.

But the real credit goes to their mother. She made the decision to be a stay-at-home mom – the most important and difficult career choice on the planet – and the credit for the successful men both of my sons turned out to be, goes to her.

Marriage

Sadly, while I tried to be a good dad and a good radio general manager, I probably was lacking in the husband department. The mother of my sons and I would divorce. My life was not in proper balance. Don’t let this happen to you.

Stay Curious

When you’re starting out, you are very curious about how everything works. You’re like a sponge trying to soak it all in. Don’t lose that curiosity. Always pitch in and do whatever needs to be done. Always listen to the ideas of others; it might surprise you how much they know. Make every day a new day to learn and grow and be better than you were yesterday.

Management

When you manage people, unlike things, know that each one is different. Each person is an individual and there’s no “one size fits all” approach. Celebrate your people’s victories, benchmarks and life events. Empower your people to not need you. Compliment in public, correct in private. Compliment in a note, correct face-to-face.

Listen

You were born with two ears and one mouth. Listening is what you should be doing twice as much as a general manager. Just because you’re the GM doesn’t mean you have all the answers. You don’t. Collaboration is the 21st Century Skill Set. It’s been my experience that often the answers to the problems confronting my radio stations were inside my own workforce. As manager, it was my job to get the answers out of them.

My Boss is a Bastard

This is a tough one. You never really want to work for a boss who’s an S.O.B. But sometimes family obligations put you in that uncomfortable position of just having to tough it out until you can make a change. I tell my students when we go over case studies of employees working for a bastard that unlike now – when they are students with no other people they are responsible for – it seems like it would be easy to just walk away from a terrible employment situation, but when you have a mortgage, car loan, kids, etc. you can’t. But what you can do is begin your job search and get out of there as soon as you can. Bad work relationships are toxic. Don’t stay in one.

It’s About More than Work

New managers sometimes have a hard time understanding why everyone isn’t as dedicated as they are to their job. But often, the reality is, your employees have lives outside of their workplace and those lives aren’t always smooth sailing. Each of us has a finite emotional capacity. So if their home life is stealing more than 50% of their emotional capacity, it leaves less capacity for the office. So if one of your best employees is suddenly under-performing, explore what’s going on in the rest of their life and how you, as their manager, can help them through this rough patch in their life. People will never forget how you made them feel when they needed your help and understanding the most. Even better, when that rough patch is over, you have one of the most empowered and dedicated employees now on your team.

Does Everyone Share the Same Mission?

Every company has a “Mission Statement.” Most are too long and rarely remembered, let alone embraced and understood by every employee. And that’s a BIG problem for you, the general manager.

There’s an old story about President Kennedy visiting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration complex when he stopped and asked a person cleaning the floor what his job was. The person said their job was to put a man on the moon. Now that’s a focused workforce. What would your people say they do in your radio station if someone were to ask?

Don’t wonder what the answer is, ask your people. Get everyone on the same page.

Facebook

The world we live in today has blurred the lines between our work life and our home life. Our computers, tablets and smartphones now mean we are always available to our employer and always able to connect with our social networks. So should you ban Facebook? I was asked do to that once by one of my employees. My response was “no” I would not ban Facebook. And here’s why: First, that person got all their work done and done correctly. That person was available to me at any time 24/7 if I needed something fixed regarding our program logs. If I could invade their home life, if necessary, then their home life could invade my work place.

The good news is recent research has shown that employees who take social network breaks online are more productive than those that don’t. Everyone needs to take a break and refresh to continue to perform at the highest levels they are possible of achieving.

Sales people are known to take a break after a lot of “No’s” and hit some golf balls at the driving range to refresh and get back to closing sales.

Personal Ethics

You know right from wrong. Never let any work place or manager compromise your personal ethics or values. If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, it’s a duck. And if that “duck” doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. Take a stand. Speak up, especially if you’re the manager because your people only have you standing between them and the top management of your company.

Failure is Learning

Want to learn more, fail more often and more quickly. Sounds counter-intuitive but research has proven that failure is all part of the way we learn. We only eliminate the unsuccessful paths by finding out if they lead us to success or not.

I had the opportunity to visit the Thomas Edison laboratory in New Jersey. A sign in the lab where Edison had invented the light bulb had this Edison quote: “I have not failed. I have just found 10,000 ways that don’t work.” Don’t fear failure. Learn to take risks.

Management vs. Leadership

In the end, what you really want to become is a leader. What’s the difference you ask? Peter Drucker says it best:

Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.

Reprinted by permission.

Dick Taylor has been “Radio Guy” all his life and is currently a professor of broadcasting at the School of Journalism & Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University (WKU) in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Dick shares his thoughts on radio and media frequently at https://dicktaylorblog.com.

NAB to Focus on the Opioid Epidemic

NABBroadcasters: Making a Difference in the Opioid Epidemic

Nearly 78 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. That staggering statistic is but one reason key members of Congress reached out to NAB and asked for broadcasters’ help to stem the epidemic of prescription drug and heroin addiction that is ravaging our communities.

Congress recognizes the unique ability of local broadcasters to reach listeners and viewers with important social messages, driving them to take action.

To answer this call for help, the NAB Joint Board of Directors has approved a voluntary commitment of broadcasters to address the opioid/heroin addiction crisis over the coming year. Stations will be provided with a digital toolkit that includes resources such as public service announcements, online digital messaging and suggested town hall meetings.

On September 13,  the NAB is scheduled to announce this commitment jointly with the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. At this event we will spotlight the numerous ways broadcasters are already answering this call, with remarks from Sen. Gordon Smith, NAB president and CEO; Art Brooks, president of the Arizona Broadcasters Association; Rebecca Hanson, senior vice president of Strategy and Policy of Sinclair Broadcast Group; Ginny Morris, chair and chief executive officer of Hubbard Radio Group and Jordan Wertlieb, president of Hearst Television.

The press conference will also include remarks from the following members of Congress: Sens. Chuck Grassley (IA), Amy Klobuchar (MN), Patrick Leahy (VT), John McCain (AZ) and Chris Murphy (CT), and Reps. John Conyers (MI-13), Bob Goodlatte (VA-06) and Frank Pallone (NJ-06).

We are excited about this event and appreciate your support of this important effort. Stay tuned for more information tomorrow about this event and a link to a digital toolkit where you can download spots, programming ideas, social media tools and additional resources.

MAB Presents FREE Lytle Sales Management Webinar This Wednesday

mabinstantRegister NOW for Scarce Talent: Recruiting and Hiring the Best Salespeople

When:  Wednesday, September 14, 2016,  1:00 p.m. EST
Register here

Quick Question: Have you ever hired a salesperson who performed better on the interview than she did on the job?

Join the club.

And then, plan to attend this fast-paced, highly-detailed FREE webinar.

Chris Lytle
Chris Lytle

It’s the third in a series of four broadcast-specific sales management sessions. And, it’s personally conducted by Chris Lytle.  Topics covered include:

    • The #1 reason you can’t find good salespeople.
    • Why sales managers make lousy interviewers.
    • Quit making this deadly hiring mistake.
    • How one A player can replace three or more warm bodies.
    • Two things you must know about A players.
    • The 3 components of a well-rounded hiring decision.
    • Why it’s critical to hire for traits and attitudes rather than skills and experience.
    • The question to ask the candidate before he sits down.
    • The #1 mistake sales managers make when reading resumes and how to avoid it.
    • Breaking down the hiring process into seven repeatable steps.
    • Why you must ask these two embarrassing interview questions.
    • How to get the candidate’s referrals to talk.

This webinar will be recorded and archived.

Chris Lytle is the author of “The Accidental Sales Manager: How to Take Control and Lead Your Team to Record Profits.” He is excited to share these ideas about hiring the very best salespeople. Once again, he promises you more usable information per minute than any sales management learning session on the market.

Please register here.  After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Shiels Inducted into Michigan Irish American Hall of Fame

MPSMichigan statewide syndicated radio personality Michael Patrick Shiels is among five honorees inducted into the 2016 class of the Michigan Irish American Hall of Fame.

Shiels is the arts and entertainment category inductee.  He hosts “Michigan’s Big Show,” which originates from Lansing and is heard on nine stations statewide.  He has won “Network Radio Personality of the Year” in the MAB’s Broadcast Excellence Awards on multiple occasions.

He hosts his show live from Ireland each St. Patrick’s Day.

Other inductees include former Governor James J. Blanchard, Detroit Public Schools Special Education Teacher Kathleen Dewan O’Neill (who also hosts a weekly Irish radio show on WNZK-AM in Detroit); writer and Schoolcraft College Adjunct Professor James J. O’Kelly; and Michael W. Kerwin, who serves on the Executive Board of the Gaelic League and is Chairman of its Culture Committee.

More information here.