All posts by Tim Moore

The Leadership Lie

Tim Moore

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Tim Moore,
Managing Partner
Audience Development Group

Tim Moore will be speaking at the Great Lakes Media Show, NEXT WEEK (March 5-6, 2019) in Lansing.  For more information and to register, click here.

Campaigns have been lost because field leaders demurred. Some Radio companies suffocate because a few managers insist on running around issuing insensate commands, spewing forth edicts. Financial stress may lead to added “systems” everywhere; manuals, rules and a handful of people at the top charged with inventing new ones.

“What I want is someone who’ll do exactly what I tell them to,” said a guy recently dismissed from a northwest regional corporate group. Another recently overheard at a conference admitted, “I need someone who will work for less.” Still others infer they really only want a department head that will follow the bread crumbs, show up on time and doesn’t give them any grief. So we ask, if this is what a company really wants, how do we explain the true stars of a company who don’t abide by these invectives?

How come the people who rise through promotions that include expense accounts and privileges are lured away by other broadcast companies, only to be written up in the trades, and who may ultimately have attendants and a catered lunch?

What a great leader really wants is an “artist” in their role; someone who can change everything and make dreams reality for his or her teammates. What leaders really want is a difference-maker. Failing that, of course they’ll settle for an inexpensive drone. So many people in and outside media have been conditioned to be a replaceable part in a large machine. They’ve been taught to care-but not that much-about their job, your listeners or your Ad clients. Often, they’ve been repeatedly messaged to “just fit in.”

At the top of the pyramid for Radio’s corporate model are those leaders who knowingly or not, possess high scores on the ADG Temperament Traits index. Expressiveness: the effort to go beyond boiler plate communication (written or verbal) to articulate a goal and the method for reaching it. Balanced Dominance: those who’ve read military history know General Patton was an all-out “driver,” never unsure about a battle objective. But history documents Admiral Nimitz, (less celebrated because he never sought celebration) was even more effective in his leadership style. Empathy: never to be confused with “sympathy,” the leader practicing empathy understands differences among people, flexing just enough to exploit their strengths while minimizing their shortfalls. Intuition: it may seem natural, even comfortable to live the life of the worker-bee but in fact it’s relatively recent in our culture and is totally manmade, yet so predictable that when we see someone off that grid we view them as an outlier!

Over the last decade in Broadcasting among other fields, it has become increasingly clear those staff members, talent or sales people, who reject the worst of a tired and stale routine are far more likely to succeed! We’ve been trained to believe mediocre obedience is something in-born; genetic in most who seek a career in or outside media. But science points out the trait of “implied obedience” doesn’t even show up or take root until after several years of schooling.

If you’re compelled to break out of a traditional worn out pattern of leadership, stop acting the part. You get what you focus on and you are what your results say you are. So if you decide to take the high ground through brave and artistic leadership, the rising tide of esprit de corps is a certainty…and so are the results.

Tim Moore is Managing Partner of Audience Development Group, based in Grand Rapids, MI and Naples, FL.  Moore thrives on innovating, and the road not taken. At 29, he became Vice President for the TM Companies (Dallas), and shortly thereafter, was awarded executive VP stripes, overseeing both TM Productions and TM Programming for Roy Disney’s parent ownership, Shamrock Broadcasting.

From there Moore began buying radio stations at age 33. Building formats from the ground-up, each station became ratings and revenue success stories. In the mid 90’s he formally established Audience Development Group with colleague Alan Mason, resurrecting a name he and Jon Coleman had intended for a research company, while colleagues at TM.

With consolidation, Audience Development Group’s business plan calling for a “Mayo Clinic” cluster-approach with expertise in multiple formats resulted in a highly successful national reputation, strategically positioned to provide cluster guidance for multiple formats in markets of all sizes.

In 2004, Moore’s book The Motivator, a collection of leadership essays was widely read and endorsed by the Radio Advertising Bureau. He also authors the firm’s weekly E-Column Midweek Motivator, distributed to thousands of media readers each week.

Tim lives in Naples, Florida, travels coast to coast, and has addressed the NAB, RAB, Canadian Broadcasters, Conclave and countless state associations. He holds a degree in Broadcast and Cinematic Arts from CMU, and is a U.S. Navy veteran.

2019: Does Talent Really Matter?

Tim Moore

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Tim Moore,
Managing Partner
Audience Development Group

Tim Moore will be speaking at the Great Lakes Media Show, March 5-6, 2019 in Lansing.  For more information and to register, click here.

Mega groups are struggling with capital debt which means less emphasis on performance underscored by fewer program directors who have the time or training to recruit much less coach their airstaff under the toxic presumption “listeners don’t really care about personalities.” The choice is simple; as a PD you can be an artist or a victim. “Artists” have the personal power to help make their people and products better. Victims float along with matchless strategic vacuity…and when that occurs, no matter the format, size or scope of a radio brand, it’s locked in neutral (which really means in decline).

In 2018, yours truly conducted twenty-three Focus Groups across multiple formats (something we offer our programming clients as value-added). We’ve done them from San Diego to New York and a lot of markets in between. Is there one universal, inarguable outcome regardless of format? Yes: listeners everywhere highly value personalities on the radio and each panel talks about their favorite personalities while offering anecdotal observations-even criticism-for some.

You would think with all the peripheral noise radio personalities just wouldn’t matter as much today. You would be dead-wrong. When a focus panel can talk in depth about a show’s content, its cast members and/or unusual nuances, you know they’re fully engaged. If your company doesn’t believe it or worse, doesn’t care, expressed through a favorite response: “Can’t we track it?,” you have a rugged road ahead. Here is what we know and stronger radio companies support: with the exception of Spoken Word formats, seventy-five percent of an audience will come to a radio station based on its music exclusivity, but it’s only twenty-five percent of why they leave!

This delivers us to a paradox: winning stations and their ownership know the value of “what’s between the songs.” Crossing all format boundaries to include News-Talk and Sports, Focus Group after Focus Group loudly proclaim, “talent matters a lot!” Often, we ask them to scale it: “One to ten, (ten meaning very important, ‘one’ meaning not at all important), where do you guys rank the Q-105 morning show?” Over the past year I can’t recall a ranking lower than 7.

Probing deeper with a simple question like, “What leads you guys to feel that way about Rock 95’s Morning Sickness?” We often hear very specific descriptions of why and how they’ve attached to a personality or show: “Well, they talk to us, not at us…”

As a Manager, as a Program Director, “passion” means caring enough about your art that you’ll do almost anything to share it, give it away, making it a gift to change people in your building. Whining and fear become self-fulfilling prophecies in stressed organizations, yet the greatest property in front of more than two hundred seventy-million American weekly listeners is the very basic opportunity to make a difference in someone’s day which simply can’t be done with songs alone. Focus panelists are universal in this proclamation.

When a programming person or a talent says, “I don’t have any good ideas,” I ask them, “Well do you have any bad ideas?” Eighty percent of the time they answer, “no.” They need and deserve your leadership and support.

It’s a new year; do you believe your company culture appreciates the proven critical importance of their air talent? Assuming they do, how can you collaborate to raise your talent staff’s awareness and performance? You don’t need more genius, you need more commitment. Just ask a Focus Group.

Tim Moore is Managing Partner of Audience Development Group, based in Grand Rapids, MI and Naples, FL.  Moore thrives on innovating, and the road not taken. At 29, he became Vice President for the TM Companies (Dallas), and shortly thereafter, was awarded executive VP stripes, overseeing both TM Productions and TM Programming for Roy Disney’s parent ownership, Shamrock Broadcasting.

From there Moore began buying radio stations at age 33. Building formats from the ground-up, each station became ratings and revenue success stories. In the mid 90’s he formally established Audience Development Group with colleague Alan Mason, resurrecting a name he and Jon Coleman had intended for a research company, while colleagues at TM.

With consolidation, Audience Development Group’s business plan calling for a “Mayo Clinic” cluster-approach with expertise in multiple formats resulted in a highly successful national reputation, strategically positioned to provide cluster guidance for multiple formats in markets of all sizes.

In 2004, Moore’s book The Motivator, a collection of leadership essays was widely read and endorsed by the Radio Advertising Bureau. He also authors the firm’s weekly E-Column Midweek Motivator, distributed to thousands of media readers each week.

Tim lives in Naples, Florida, travels coast to coast, and has addressed the NAB, RAB, Canadian Broadcasters, Conclave and countless state associations. He holds a degree in Broadcast and Cinematic Arts from CMU, and is a U.S. Navy veteran.

Is Life Keeping You from Getting What You Want?

Tim Moore

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Tim Moore,
Managing Partner
Audience Development Group

Tim Moore will be speaking at the Great Lakes Media Show, March 5-6, 2019 in Lansing.  For more information and to register, click here.

Someone said, when 99 percent of your life is work, you’re either really lousy at your profession, or you’re totally unbalanced with the rest of your life; and neither is something to be proud of.

A couple of questions: first, early-on did you experience a professional failure? If so, what did that contribute to success later in your life? While no one should dwell on disappointment, if you think back to a “favorite failure,” what can you take from it? There is a prevailing misconception that a failure can define us. Well, there are “failures” and then there are failures. There’s a big difference between flunking out of business school and failing in a parental relationship. In radio, sometimes a market manager falls short when up against a rival with superior resources. Yet what we take away from a disappointment is as valuable as having won on our first toss, though too few among us are programmed to think that way.

There are only two types of human beings engaged in any professional environment; Work Processors and Work Creators. They approach life very differently and neither should be criticized. A Work Processor is necessary; important to an organization, and defines their effectiveness through daily tasks and their ability to complete them. The Processor sees their day or week in measured units, viewing their job as a means to an end: “If I do this well for the next fifteen years, I’ll earn enough to retire and live in Myrtle Beach.” 75% of the Processor’s emotional satisfaction comes from off-the-job experiences. This doesn’t suggest a lack of motivation or dedication; it’s simply a different set of focus. Without consistent performers who fit the “processor” definition, there is no company.

Work Creators flip the criteria. It’s important to stop action, take inventory, and try to be introspective. Do the following describe your place in the organization? Work Creators are equally important to their company, defining their role as an incubator for concepts and plans. “Creators” often spark flames of aggressive growth and change; “good enough” is never good enough. They don’t view their position as a means-to-an-end; instead they see what they contribute as an end in itself. 75% of the Creator’s satisfaction comes from the job itself. When asked, a Creator usually has his or her short-list of favorite failures, though they seldom attach regret or dwell on disappointment; instead saying something like, “So I learned to turn it inside-out and the next version exceeded my wildest expectation!”

Processor or Creator, it matters not. The entire spectrum of life is within us. We have a lot of power to change something through processing or by creating. We don’t need a million dollars, or a zillion Facebook followers!

A great organization knows its rhythm, knows its balance, while collecting inspired people who recognize that an exceptional company believes people are the future for processing and creating.

In broadcasting like any other strategically charged field, turnover is the enemy of success. And sometimes, it takes just one catastrophic failure to redirect us to a life-change that will make all the difference.

Tim Moore is Managing Partner of Audience Development Group, based in Grand Rapids, MI and Naples, FL.  Moore thrives on innovating, and the road not taken. At 29, he became Vice President for the TM Companies (Dallas), and shortly thereafter, was awarded executive VP stripes, overseeing both TM Productions and TM Programming for Roy Disney’s parent ownership, Shamrock Broadcasting.

From there Moore began buying radio stations at age 33. Building formats from the ground-up, each station became ratings and revenue success stories. In the mid 90’s he formally established Audience Development Group with colleague Alan Mason, resurrecting a name he and Jon Coleman had intended for a research company, while colleagues at TM.

With consolidation, Audience Development Group’s business plan calling for a “Mayo Clinic” cluster-approach with expertise in multiple formats resulted in a highly successful national reputation, strategically positioned to provide cluster guidance for multiple formats in markets of all sizes.

In 2004, Moore’s book The Motivator, a collection of leadership essays was widely read and endorsed by the Radio Advertising Bureau. He also authors the firm’s weekly E-Column Midweek Motivator, distributed to thousands of media readers each week.

Tim lives in Naples, Florida, travels coast to coast, and has addressed the NAB, RAB, Canadian Broadcasters, Conclave and countless state associations. He holds a degree in Broadcast and Cinematic Arts from CMU, and is a U.S. Navy veteran.

Something in the Air

Tim Moore

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Tim Moore,
Managing Partner
Audience Development Group

“The radio business is a cruel and shallow trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There’s also a negative side.” -Hunter S. Thompson

Reading with interest a late week e-mail criticizing a national media company, there was that sense again. Our business has forged ever deeper into a winding tunnel of change; the kind those visionary entrepreneurs like Storz, McLendon, Fairbanks or Mays who came before us could not have imagined. What began as escapist entertainment for generations of Americans has ultimately become an asset (or liability) on the books of some national companies that might have become huge successes had their grand blueprint succeeded. Rumors fly, innuendo abounds, sell-offs are in play.

Segments of radio grope in the darkness; a business for sale, praying it doesn’t find a buyer. Yet a new sun is waiting, just beyond the dawn. Highly capable ownerships are re-tooling while others are forming-up to take their place in the emerging void brought about by bad directions and poor designs. As we turn into the final lap of the year about to melt into the next, here for your review, Audience Development Group’s “Best Practices Inventory.”

ADG’s Salient Seven: rate your group’s alignment with the following, scale of 1 to 5:

____High Values Awareness

Company vision and standards are regularly communicated and graded to build awareness throughout your group, regardless of its size and scope.

____High Values Accountability

Results are the name of the game, but they’re not achieved in a vacuum. Evaluate your people on standards in parallel with results; show little-tolerance for intentional violations.

____Leadership By Example

The only way you can expect management to work is through being skillfully equipped to instill West Point’s brilliant definition of leadership… simply stated, “Follow me.”

____Continuity Of Words & Deeds

Radio has become famous for its contradictory cluster-communication of mixed messages and conflicting objectives. No organization can eclipse competitors if its people are inherently confused about the plan they’re following. Worse, some don’t have a plan.

_____Attention to Perception-Management

Only highly evolved companies and their leadership are aware of the impact of the company’s attitude and sense-of-self. This is not about manipulating the truth, instead unceasing awareness of the values within which your people either succeed or fail.

_____Positive Change by Increments

No negative situation was ever completely reversed in 24 hours or 24 months. In current times our attentions should be mono-focused on tangible improvements every day, as opposed to Hail Mary passes based on quick-fix voodoo or the promotion-of-the-month.

_____Radio is supposed to be all about belief in advertising… except in its own case. How’s yours?

It’s time to change who we are and what we believe we deserve. The future belongs to better leaders and more motivated teammates with stronger belief. Some are acting on it. Others never will.

Tim Moore will be speaking at the Great Lakes Media Show, March 5-6, 2019 in Lansing.  For more information and to register, click here.

Tim Moore is Managing Partner of Audience Development Group, based in Grand Rapids, MI and Naples, FL.  Moore thrives on innovating, and the road not taken. At 29, he became Vice President for the TM Companies (Dallas), and shortly thereafter, was awarded executive VP stripes, overseeing both TM Productions and TM Programming for Roy Disney’s parent ownership, Shamrock Broadcasting.

From there Moore began buying radio stations at age 33. Building formats from the ground-up, each station became ratings and revenue success stories. In the mid 90’s he formally established Audience Development Group with colleague Alan Mason, resurrecting a name he and Jon Coleman had intended for a research company, while colleagues at TM.

With consolidation, Audience Development Group’s business plan calling for a “Mayo Clinic” cluster-approach with expertise in multiple formats resulted in a highly successful national reputation, strategically positioned to provide cluster guidance for multiple formats in markets of all sizes.

In 2004, Moore’s book The Motivator, a collection of leadership essays was widely read and endorsed by the Radio Advertising Bureau. He also authors the firm’s weekly E-Column Midweek Motivator, distributed to thousands of media readers each week.

Tim lives in Naples, Florida, travels coast to coast, and has addressed the NAB, RAB, Canadian Broadcasters, Conclave and countless state associations. He holds a degree in Broadcast and Cinematic Arts from CMU, and is a U.S. Navy veteran.