Category Archives: Digital/Social/Web

Your Radio Station Staff Should Have These Images on Hand

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

With the rise of the worldwide web, even audio mediums like ours have an increasing need for a strong visual presence. Chances are, multiple staff members at your radio station, from your Promotions Director to your Web Designer to your Salespeople, will need station images from time to time. It’s a good idea to set up a shared folder where the appropriate people can easily access these images:

  • The station logo (color)
  • The station logo (black and white)
  • A collection of logos from stations in the cluster
  • The company logo
  • The morning show logo
  • Logos for key station events, such as annual concerts
  • Headshots of each on-air personality
  • A publicity photo of the morning show
  • Various “action” publicity photos, such as the street team at an on-site promotion or a DJ introducing a band onstage at a concert

By collecting pre-approved images into one place, you’ll make everybody’s job easier. Now they don’t have to waste time hunting them down.

Web vs. Print Images
It’s important for your staff to know the difference between image files that are suitable to be used on the web, and files that are appropriate for use in printed materials. For the web, you want image files to be small, so they load quickly. The resolution of an image is measured in “dots per inch,” or “DPI.” (Technically, web images are measured in “pixels per inch,” but “PPI” and “DPI” are often used interchangeably.) On computer screens, images only need to be 72 dots per inch to look crisp to the human eye.

On the other hand, printed images need a higher resolution to look crisp. Print houses usually require that artwork be at least 300 dots per inch. If you try to use a 72-dpi image for printed materials, it will look “pixelated.” One of the easiest ways to slow a project down is to send a designer or print house a 72-dpi image when they need a 300-dpi image. In your shared images folder, it’s a good idea to have one subfolder labeled “Web Images” filled with 72-dpi versions of the images and another subfolder labeled “Print Images” containing 300-dpi versions of the same images.

Image Formats
Images can come in a number of different file formats. Each format has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. You can read this deep-dive into the formats, but here are the key points to remember:

  • .JPG or .JPEG: Compresses the file to make it smaller, making it quick to load on websites, but there is a slight loss in image quality; you cannot save transparency (such as a transparent background) with this file format.
  • .PNG: Compresses the file without any loss in quality and it can save transparency.
  • .TIF or .TIFF: Good for print, but often produces files that are larger than you want for the web.
  • .GIF: Compresses the file to make it smaller; it can be animated and it can save transparency, however it is limited to only 256 colors.

These file formats are used with specific image editing programs; you probably won’t use them unless a graphic designer requests them:

.PSD (Photoshop)
.AI (Adobe Illustrator)
.XCF (GIMP)
.CDR (CorelDRAW)

A small way to make everybody’s job easier at your radio station is to make sure that staff members can quickly and easily get the images they need in multiple file formats. It helps to include a “cheat sheet” in your shared image folder to help people understand which images to use under different circumstances. By doing this, you can save your staff some time.

 

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

How to Repurpose Audio as Video to Promote Your Radio Station on Social Media

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

As radio broadcasters, we create audio content day in and day out. Unfortunately, audio doesn’t go viral on social media. If we want our audio content to spread, it’s best to turn it into video before posting it to social networks. Fortunately, there are a host of tools to help us do that.

Audiograms
Radio morning shows routinely take an excerpt from their latest show and repurpose as a recorded promo. That same recorded promo can also be repurposed as an audiogram.

An audiogram is a video that combines a static image with a waveform to match overlayed audio. For example, here is an audiogram that I recently created for my podcast, The D Brief:

There are a number of tools available to help you quickly and easily convert your audio into an audiogram. The audiogram above was made with Wavve.co. You may also want to look into Audiogram, Repurpose or SpareMin. Many podcasters use Auphonic to polish up the sound quality of their episodes, and it is also capable of creating audiograms.

Here is an audiogram made with Audiogram:

Ripl and Sweepers
Another tool that I like to use is Ripl. Ripl is a smartphone app that allows you to take a produced sweeper and turn it into a short video promo, like this:

Ripl is designed to be a full-blown social media marketing solution, allowing you to easily share videos to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. It also provides analytics so you can measure the engagement your videos produce.

Sometimes I use Ripl for generic promos like the one above. Other times, I’ll use it to promote a specific podcast episode:

Your radio station can use Ripl to promote upcoming interviews, contest or station events.

Note that these tools produce square videos. That’s because Instagram uses square videos, and because square videos take up more of the screen when viewed in Facebook on a smartphone.

Experiment with these tools and see if you can find one that fits best into your workflow. By taking a few extra minutes each day, you can repurpose your radio station’s on-air content as videos that are more likely to be shared on social media.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

Here’s Why Most Podcast Listening Happens on Apple Devices

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

The overwhelming majority of podcast listening happens on Apple devices. While it can fluctuate, podcast hosting companies will tell you that roughly two-thirds of all podcast consumption takes place on iOS devices. Android comes in a distant second place.

So, why does Apple dominate the podcast medium?

To understand that, we need to take a closer look at the process involved in listening to a podcast. This process is slightly different on the two operating systems.

Apple used to include podcasts in a dedicated section of iTunes, its music management app. When it introduced iOS6 in 2012, it separated podcasts out into their own app, called Podcasts. When Apple introduced iOS8 in 2014, it made Podcasts a native app. That is, the Podcasts app came pre-installed on every iOS device; people no longer needed to download it from the App Store themselves.

So the steps required to listen to a podcast became:

  1. Open the Podcasts app.
  2. Find the podcast you want.
  3. Subscribe to the podcast.
  4. Download the latest episode.
  5. Play the episode.

Android phones, on the other hand, do not come with a dedicated podcast app already installed. As a result, listening to a podcast on an Android phone requires a few more hoops:

  1. Open the app store.
  2. Find and download a “podcatcher” (an app for listening to podcasts).
  3. Open the podcatcher.
  4. Find the podcast you want.
  5. Subscribe to the podcast.
  6. Download the latest episode.
  7. Play the episode.

It’s just a couple of extra steps, but those steps have a huge impact on podcast listening. That’s why many people in the podcasting space, myself included, believe the top factor that would increase the number of people who listen to podcasts globally is not just the release of compelling content (like Serial), but rather a technological development; if Google embraced podcasts by including a native podcatcher on every phone, listenership would increase dramatically.

Google took a step in the right direction in 2015, when it started including podcasts in its Google Play Music app; but this really just brings Google up to where Apple was in 2013, when it still included podcasts in a section of iTunes.

Of course, there are other technological developments that could drive more podcast listening. Spotify has embraced podcasts recently, and its app is installed on thousands of Android phones. Smart speakers, like the Amazon Echo and Google Home, could also contribute to an increase in podcast listening. So could dashboard operating systems like Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Still, the development that most of us are waiting for is the native Android podcatcher. It may come any day now, or it may never arrive. We’ll just have to wait and see.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

Write Digital Instructions to Help With Radio Station Staff Turnover

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

I tell people that you’re not really in the radio industry until you’ve been fired at least once. We work in an industry with a lot of turnover, and that means we can lose a lot of time to learning curves as new people step in to take over the duties of previous employees.

It’s not just staffing changes that can cause disruptions. If a member of your team gets sick or injured, you may need somebody to step in and fill their role for a bit. To minimize the digital disruption in these situations, it’s helpful to write instructions and save them in a place where multiple people have access to them.

I am a big proponent of writing out clear step-by-step instructions, complete with annotated screenshots, for every digital task you can’t live without. Here are some of the things you will want to have instructions for:

  • How to send an email blast
  • How to send a text message blast
  • How to publish a blogpost
  • How to update the website’s concert calendar
  • How to set up a contest on the website
  • How to publish a podcast episode
  • How to back up the website
  • How to restore a backup of the website
  • How to publish a video to the station’s YouTube channel
  • How to set up online ticket sales for a station event
  • How to post an advertisement on the website

These instructions are useful not only to people who have to take over a role, but also to the same person who may have performed the task in the past. Because I do it so infrequently, I often have to go back and figure out what I did the previous year. If you’re responsible for an infrequent task, such as setting up ticket sales for an annual station concert, it can be incredibly valuable to go back and read instructions — even if you’re the one who wrote them!

If you don’t already have instructions for your most important digital tasks, start writing them today. The next time you have a staff position turnover, you’ll be glad that you did.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

How a Content Calendar Can Improve Your Radio Station’s Blog

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

When I was the Music Director at 107.7 The End in Seattle, I spent every minute of my workday trying to achieve the right mix of on-air content. Like most radio stations, we had expensive software that enabled me to a balance of new and old, hard and soft, fast and slow. The goal was to create an on-air product that appealed to a wide swath of listeners.

The goal of your radio station’s website is the same. But do you invest as much energy into getting the mix of content right?

Just like the music scheduling software you use for your on-air content, it’s helpful to have a tool to get the right mix of online content. Fortunately, it’s not going to cost you anything.

The Weekly Web Meeting and the Content Calendar

Radio stations should carve out time with the appropriate staff members for a weekly meeting to plan out the upcoming week’s blogposts. Spend the first half of the meeting on old business: review your website, social media, and email analytics, much like you would review callout research in a music meeting.

Next, turn to new business: The analytics you just reviewed can help you decide what new blogposts to write. In place of music scheduling software, use a spreadsheet to schedule the week’s blogposts. I recommend posting this spreadsheet as a shareable document in the cloud — as a Google Spreadsheet, for example — so everybody can log in at any time and see the latest version. This way, you don’t have to email back and forth about every blogpost.

Download a Content Calendar Template

In your weekly web meeting, decide what topics you want to cover in the blog during the upcoming week. For example:

  • What events are happening in town?
  • What concerts are coming up?
  • What new albums will be released?
  • What holidays are around the corner?

More Blogpost Ideas

Once you’ve decided what blogposts to write, assign the posts to your staff members with the appropriate due dates.

Encourage your staff to check the Content Calendar regularly throughout the week. This way, not only will your blog writers will know what’s due when, but your on-air staff will know when there’s new blogposts that they can talk about on the air.

In short, it’s time that your radio station put the same amount of careful planning into your online content as you do your on-air content. A Content Calendar can help you do that.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

5 Browser Extensions to Boost Your Productivity

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

I spend hours on my web browser each day. In fact, without a browser, I would be unable to do my job. Over the years, I’ve incorporated a number of browser extensions (Mozilla calls them “Add-Ons”) into my daily routine. Extensions are third party plugins that add extra functionality to a web browser. When you install a browser extension, they usually add an extra button to the toolbar.

Here are some of my favorites that you may want to use:

1. Hootsuite’s Hootlet
I work with a ton of social media accounts. In addition to running my personal Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram accounts, I handle accounts for Jacobs Media, my podcast The D Brief, and various other side projects. I find that the easiest way to manage all of these accounts is to use a social media management tool. While I know a lot of people who are fans of TweetDeck, I have always been partial to Hootsuite. Hootsuite allows you to manage all of your social media accounts from a single place.

One of my favorite features of Hootsuite is a browser extension called the Hootlet. The Hootlet allows you to quickly and easily share the webpage you are on to your social media accounts. Whenever I come across an article that I think will interest Jacobs Media followers, I press the Hootlet button and a pop-up window appears. I write a quick post and share the webpage on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn in one fell swoop.

Get the Hootsuite Hootlet for Chrome or Firefox. TweetDeck has a similar browser extension called Tweetdeck Launcher for Chrome.

2. Pushbullet
I use many different devices, and they don’t always use the same operating system. For example, I have an Android phone, but an iPad and an iMac. Sometimes I want to share something between these different devices. For example, I often begin writing my blogposts in an app called Drafts on my iPad before moving it to my desktop so I can import the text into WordPress and format it. Other times, I’ll take photos on my phone at an event like CES and then want to share them with my iMac to use them in a blogpost.

I have found the Pushbullet app to be incredibly useful for pushing content from one device to another. It’s often faster and easier than using a thumb drive or even a filesharing service like Dropbox. And, of course, Pushbullet offers a browser extension. This allows me to push content to or from a browser to one of my other devices. You can get it for Chrome or Firefox.

3. Priceblink
Priceblink is one of several browser extensions that comes in handy when looking to buy something online. When you go to a product page on a website like Amazon, Priceblink will check other sites to see if any of them are selling the same product for less. It will also let you know if there are any coupon codes for that product floating around the web. I frequently find myself saving money with the Proceblink extension, which you can get for Chrome or Firefox.

4. Bulk URL Opener
I am known for having an absurd number of browser tabs open at all times. For example, I will open dozens of URLs at once when doing show prep for my weekly podcast, The D Brief. To do this, I use an extension called the Bulk URL Opener. It allows me to paste a list of URLs into a pop-up window and open them all at once. If you have a list of websites that you want to check quickly, such as a list of concert venues in your market, this extension comes in quite handy. You can get it for Chrome, or a similar extension for Firefox.

5. MightyText
Like many people, I find text messaging to be an incredibly convenient form of communication. But when I’m working on the computer, I find it annoying to constantly have to pick up my phone to respond to people. That’s why I use MightyText, an app that allows me to send and receive text messages on my computer. Like these other apps, MightyText has a browser extension that allows you to easily correspond with people from within Chrome.

Do you have a web browser extension that you recommend? Tell us about it in the comments.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

20 Digital New Year’s Resolutions for Your Radio Station

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

It’s that time of year when we set goals for ourselves and our radio stations. What will your 2018 digital strategy resolutions be? If you need some inspiration, here are some ideas:

Website

Blog

Email Marketing

Podcasts

Other Departments

Interfaces

This is the year to take your radio station’s digital strategy to the next level. Let me know if I can help.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

Creating Personas: Envision the Audience for Your Radio Station’s Blog or Podcast

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

When I was the Program Director of WBRU in Providence, we often talked about “Mr. BRU,” a fictional character that represented our audience. Mr. BRU was 25 years old, single, lived in the Providence suburbs, and liked to drink beer and go to Newport in the summer. Mr. BRU helped the programming staff at the radio station think of the audience in concrete terms. Before putting a promotion on the air or creating a morning show bit, we would ask ourselves, “What would Mr. BRU think of this?”

Mr. BRU is the result of an exercise that is common not just in broadcasting, but in marketing circles as well. Mr. BRU is a persona — a personification that helps people get a handle on their audience. Gathering the staff together to create personas — it’s useful to create a few — that represent your audience helps to ensure that everybody is on the same page when it comes to creating compelling content.

The technique is useful not only for a radio station’s on-air programming, but also for a station’s blog or podcast. If you haven’t gone through this exercise with your team before (or in a long time), the launch of a station blog or podcast is a great opportunity to do so.

In all likelihood, the personas you create for your radio station’s on-air programming will be identical to those that you create for your radio station’s blog. However, because podcasts typically focus on a narrower niche that the radio station as a whole, they may require fewer, more specific personas. One Mr. BRU may drink Budweiser while a second Mr. BRU may be a beer snob; only the latter will listen to the radio station’s craft beer podcast.

Once you’ve gathered the appropriate members of your team together, give your first persona a name and brainstorm their characteristics, including:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Where they live
  • Marital status
  • Number of children
  • Type of job
  • Income level
  • Education level
  • Hobbies
  • Annual income
  • Musical tastes
  • Allegiance to sports teams
  • Political leanings
  • Other interests

Create as many personas as you need to adequately represent a wide swath of your audience (4 to 6 for your on-air programming or blog, perhaps fewer for a podcast). When you’re done, you may even want to find a place to post bios for these personas for everybody in the station to see.

Personas can help your radio station’s staff members focus on creating the most compelling content for the audience, whether on the air, on the blog or in podcasts. Carve out some time to help them envision the audience together.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

How to Add Calls to Action to Your Radio Station’s YouTube Videos

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

As mobile phones become an increasingly important channel to engage fans, YouTube has been making changes to help content creators. This involves both phasing out old features and introducing new ones. For example, on May 2nd of 2017, YouTube officially replaced its Annotations feature, which did not work on mobile devices, with the previously unveiled Cards and End Screens, which do.

YouTube will remove another feature on December 14th, when the Featured Video functionality will be removed. Featured Videos allowed content creators to designate a particular video to pop up whenever somebody watched another video by that creator. For example, I could create a short Jacobs Media Strategies promotional video, and set it to appear as a link in the lower left corner whenever people watched one of our other videos.

The problem? It turns out that very few people were clicking on these Featured Videos. YouTube rightly concluded that most people view Featured Videos as spam, so they’re eliminating the feature.

If your station has been using Featured Videos to try to engage fans (and even if it hasn’t), now would be a good time to get diligent about using YouTube’s Cards and End Screen features.

Cards and End Screens
With Cards and End Screens, YouTube made it easy to create calls to actions that appear in videos as linkable buttons. Cards go in the middle of videos, while End Screens appear during the last 20 seconds.

With Cards, you can add several calls to action inside your video, including:

  • A link to a YouTube video or playlist
  • A link to another YouTube channel
  • A “Donation” link to a non-profit organization
  • A poll
  • A link to an external website (this feature is only available to YouTube creators participating in the YouTube Partner Program)

With End Screens, you can add these calls to action:

  • A link to a YouTube video or playlist
  • A “Subscribe” link to your YouTube channel
  • A link to another YouTube channel
  • A link to an external website (this feature is only available to YouTube creators participating in the YouTube Partner Program)

To add Cards or End Screens to your video, follow these steps:

  1. Login to your radio station’s YouTube account.
  2. In the top right corner, click on your station’s icon; in the menu that pops open, click the “Creator Studio” button.
  3. In the left menu, click on “Video Manager.”
  4. Click on the title of the video that you want to add a call to action to.
  5. Above the video, you will see a horizontal menu that includes “End Screen and Annotations” and “Cards.” Select the one that you want.
  6. Use the blue “Add Element” button to add Cards or End Screens to your video.

YouTube has included a number of features to make it easier to consistently add Cards and End Screens to your videos, including Templates and the ability to copy settings from one video to another. Plus, YouTube offers reports so you can see how well they’re performing.

Of course, to use these features effectively, you’ll want to take them into consideration when creating your videos. For example, you’ll want to leave 20 seconds of black or a background image at the end of your video over which the End Screens will appear.

To learn more, check out the YouTube Creators Academy’s lesson on Cards and End Screens.

If your radio station is regularly posting videos to YouTube, taking a few extra moments to add Cards or End Screens to them can help you grow your online audience. Turn your one-time viewers into repeat customers — especially on their mobile devices.

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.

How to Get Your Listeners to Write Your Radio Station’s Blog

Seth Resler

Editor’s Note: The views and opinions of this article do not necessarily reflect those of the MAB. Contact the MAB for information on the MAB’s official editorial policy.

By: Seth Resler
Jacobs Media Strategies

I am a huge believer in using a Content Marketing strategy to grow your radio station’s audience. The basics are simple: Create a lot of compelling content on your website. Make that content easy to find in search engines and easy to share over social media. Once you draw visitors back to your website with that content, encourage them to take specific actions, such as signing up for your email list, streaming your station or clicking on an ad.

The challenge with a Content Marketing strategy is that you have to create a lot of content. As a general rule of thumb, I’d like to see radio stations create at least three original blogposts or content modules (at least 300 words long) each day. But that’s a lot for radio stations with staff members already pulling double-duty. Am I really suggesting that your midday jock/production director needs to write several posts a week on top of everything else?

Yes. But…

There is a way to implement a successful Content Marketing strategy without overtaxing your staff. It’s called “crowdsourcing.” In other words, encourage members of your audience to create content for your website.

Here’s the basic process: On the air, your station recruits people to submit guest content through the website. When listeners go to the website, they submit their content through an online form. This content is then reviewed, edited and published by a station staff member.

In this post, I’ll show you how to do all of this.

To Curate or Not to Curate?
Some online businesses allow anybody to create content and, barring anything that violates the basic guidelines, they publish it all. Think YouTube, Yelp!, etc.

Other businesses crowdsource content, but they are more selective about who they choose and pickier about what they publish. In other words, they curate the content. Think The Huffington Post.

Radio stations will want to implement the latter strategy to varying degrees. You certainly won’t want to publish everything that’s submitted to you without looking at it first. But you may only allow a few regular guest bloggers to submit articles, while you allow anybody to submit a photo as part of a contest.

Here’s what you’ll need:

1. A Content Management System (CMS) Website
Your radio station needs a website that is set up to handle lots of content. This means not just that the content can be published, but also easily organized so that your visitors can easily search and find what they want. My website platform of choice — whether you are stand-alone small market station or a multi-billion dollar media conglomerate — is WordPress. Over 60 million websites are built in WordPress (including this one) precisely because it was designed with content creation in mind.

But WordPress is not the only suitable Content Management System will do. Here’s more info.

2. Forms
The last thing you want is for listeners to email you Word documents that you then need to paste into your website and format. If you get to the point where you are creating large amounts of content — and that is the point that you want to get to — this will become a huge time-suck. Instead, create a form on the front-end of your website that allows people to submit their content and automatically formats it appropriately. If your station’s site is built in WordPress, I highly recommend the Gravity Forms premium plugin for precisely this reason.

3. Custom Fields and Taxonomies
When you publish content on your website, it’s important you categorize it appropriately so people can easily search for it. Radio stations will want to “tag” their content with certain pieces of information (or taxonomies), such as:

  • Type of Content: Interview, Morning Show Bit, Live Performance, etc.
  • Artist: Beyonce, Tim McGraw, Passion Pit, etc.
  • Air Talent: DJ No Name, J-Squizzles, Dr. Metal, etc.

While WordPress allows you to create Categories and Tags out of the box, I don’t think the default functionality is enough for radio stations. Consider using a premium plugin to allow you to add more taxonomies to your content.

4. An Editorial Calendar and Review Process
As I said earlier, radio stations will want to review and edit most listener-generated content before publishing it to their website. This means you’ll have to map out an actionable review process. Who reviews the content? How often do they review it? What kinds of things are they editing for? How often do they publish the content?

By default, WordPress offers a lot of tools to make this process easier. Posts can be saved with different statuses: Draft, Pending, or Published. For example, posts can be submitted through the form as drafts. The webmaster can review them and upgrade them to pending status. Then the Program Director can review and publish them. WordPress also allows you to schedule posts to be published in the future.

If you find that you need more sophisticated tools to control the editorial process, there are a host of WordPress plugins designed for crowdsourced blogs, such as Edit Flow.

In addition to a process, you’ll also want a calendar so you can see what’s coming up when. I have designed a GoogleDoc template that you can use.

5. A Notification Process
You’re going to want the appropriate staff member to be alerted when a listener submits a new piece of content. And you’re going to want to let that same listener know when their content has been published so that they can share it on social media. The hard way to do this is to write all of those emails yourself. But — you guessed it! — there are also plugins for this. I use Post Status Notifier.

6. Recruitment
Once you’ve got the system in place, it’s time to go find some content creators in your audience. If you are curating carefully, you may want to conduct a search. For example, find a local blogger who writes movie reviews and set him up with concert tickets in exchange for a weekly blogpost.

At other times, you may want to use your airwaves to cast a wider net. For example, you could create a contest encouraging people to snap a selfie showing how big of an AC/DC fan they are to win tickets. Use recorded promos and live reads to send people to a specific page on your website with an entry form (WKRP.com/ACDC).

An Example
So here’s what the final process might look like:

    1. You find a local blogger to write concert reviews in exchange for tickets.
    2. After each concert, she submits a review through an online form. Even though the form is on the front-end of the website, it is password protected so that only she can access it.
    3. Once she submits a review, the webmaster is automatically notified by email. He edits the review and upgrades the blogpost’s status to ‘pending.’
    4. When the blogpost’s status is upgraded, the Assistant Program Director is automatically notified by email. He reviews the post, makes a few more edits, and schedules it to publish tomorrow.
    5. When the blogpost is published, the author is automatically notified by email. Both the author and the radio station share the concert review over social media.

Ta-da! You’re regularly producing new content, and you didn’t have to put another task on your overworked midday jock’s plate!

For more assistance on digital or social media, contact MAB Member Services at mab@michmab.com or 1-800-968-7622.